A Lifetime of Happiness: Movies, TV, and Video Games

Moulin Rouge (2001)

May 11, 2022 Steve Bennet-Martin, Stephen Martin-Bennet, Ronnie Diamond Season 1 Episode 119
A Lifetime of Happiness: Movies, TV, and Video Games
Moulin Rouge (2001)
Show Notes Transcript

The Steves discuss the 2001 musical Moulin Rouge, along with what's making them happy in pop culture today.

What's Making Us Happy?

  • Buffy Season 5 (Hulu)
  • Heartstopper (Netflix)

Moulin Rouge Discussion

  • Names and Numbers
  • The History of the Moulin Rouge theatre
  • How it became a Tony-award winning musical
  • Differences between the movie and musical
  • Background on the Green Fairy
  • John Leguizamo playing a midget- is it okay?
  • The impact of Nicole's injury on set
  • The spectacularness of Spectacular, Spectacular
  • Was there any way out of the love triangle?

Ending- Any music or audio clips were borrowed from the original source material.

Support the show
Steve:

Hello, returning happys and new listeners. This is Steve Bennet-Martin,

Stephen:

and this is Stephen Martin-Bennet. And welcome to a lifetime of. The podcast where we take you on our journey through some of the movies, TV shows, and other bits of pop culture that are helping to keep us happy. We'll hopefully bring a smile to your face along the way. And today it's spectacular, spectacular, because we can, can, can, and we're going down to the Moulin Rouge,

Steve:

We're continuing musical may with one of our more recent favorite Broadway experiences. Yes, but we are going to be talking about the movie that the musical is based on, but before we get into that, What's been making you happy.

Stephen:

Oh, Netflix, Netflix, Netflix, Netflix. They created the sweetest little gay show known to man and just watching it with. A joyous experience. It's called heart

Steve:

stopper. Oh, okay. I was like queer as folk. No. Okay. Heart stopper. Yes. That was really

Stephen:

sweet. Oh, so, so sweet. And you know, it was set in the UK and not any actors other than Olivia Coleman. But I've recognized. But it, oh, I don't want to tell you anything about it because I it's one of those, I just want you to experience, but if you're looking for something that's going to make you just smile and feel all good inside. Then watch heart stopper on Netflix,

Steve:

correct? Yes. I would say that it transcends just being about a, like a coming of age, coming out story and just transcends to something that I feel like even if you're not part of the LGBT plus community, you would enjoy it as long as you like. Yes. And I have a feeling if you listen, you'd like us. Yeah.

Stephen:

And if you don't, this is probably the wrong podcast for you, but

Steve:

I it's the type of show I wish existed when I was younger telling me that

Stephen:

everything would be okay. Oh. And it also like, while being unapologetic in its portrayal of queer teen children, like it does it in such a way that. You really like, I don't want to say humanizes, but is more accessible maybe. Yeah, I would agree. And, but darling has been making you happy.

Steve:

I'm continuing my Buffy rewatch season three was making my hurt happy a week or two ago. And I am on to season

Stephen:

five. You mean the season of discontent? No. Well, I mean, they do kill off one of the nicest characters in the Buffy verse. No, that's season six,

Steve:

babe. Oh, season six is a little bit more debatable as they deal with adult issues and then they killed Tara.

Stephen:

Oh, I met Joyce,

Steve:

Joyce. Oh, well this is a fully spoiled podcast. As we mentioned coffee.

Stephen:

That was 20 years ago. Yes.

Steve:

25 years ago.

Stephen:

If you didn't know that she died by now, that's on you. Yeah.

Steve:

Yes. But yes, it is. The season that Joy's sided also is the season of glory is what I call it. Cause she's probably my favorite villain that showed up on the show. It has the best like season finale, like actual ever

Stephen:

cry every time that was technically supposed to be the series

Steve:

finale. And it does everything a series finale should do as well. Like it's very rare for a show to have not one but two series finale. Right. And both one's landed in the right way at the right time. I really feel so anyone who wants to talk Buffy come at me and we will chat away.

Stephen:

It's. You know, I've only watched the whole thing through one time, your audition

Steve:

to

Stephen:

marry you. Yes. And so I don't remember everything as clearly. So like when we're watching it back, we'll have times where I'm like, wait a minute, what's going on here? There are certain episodes. I absolutely remember every detail, but there are certain ones where I'm like, wait a minute. Why are there medieval Knights chasing them in a window? Oh,

Steve:

yeah, I got a little weird near the end of the season, but it is, I would say it's hard to say between three, five and seven, which is my favorite season, but it's definitely one of my top three, three

Stephen:

is when they graduate high school. Oh three is probably mine. That's a good one. You know, it also is a good one Moodle

Steve:

on. Yes. And for those not in the know I am DB summarizes it as a poor Bohemian poet in 1890s. False for a beautiful cortisone and nightclubs star, whomever jealous duke covets,

Stephen:

BU that

Steve:

I am DB Steve, say.

Stephen:

Hold onto your hats for a colorful musical spectacular. That's going to hit you in all the fields in all the range, and it's going to have you singing along and laughing and you're going to have a great time. And then you're going to remember, oh shit, she does die. Yeah.

Steve:

Yeah. And we'll get into that in a moment, but yes, you, why do you love it?

Stephen:

Well, oh, so It came out when I was in college and a friend came out over the summer and a friend of mine got tickets for us to go see it at the independent theater there in Morgantown. And I wasn't sure about it other than, okay. It has Nicole Kidman that I liked in some things. And so we're watching it and all of a sudden it was like, oh, I know all the songs. Oh, this is a lot of fun. Oh my God. She's really good. And it just really resonated with me. And I saw several more times in the theater. And then when it came out on DVD, I watched it a whole bunch. And then of course that was the. Of lady Marma laude, which captivated the entire country and had the amazing performance at the VH1 video music awards or the MTV video music awards. I knew that sounded wrong. And I don't know, it's just something that their performances and the music they stay with you. And it's interesting that, you know, one of the songs is an original. But another one that people so remember from this movie is the John song, your song. And I don't know, it just sticks with you. Why do you.

Steve:

I like it because we saw it on Broadway. And that was just so once in a lifetime experience of being up basically on stage and surrounded by all the actors and actresses.

Stephen:

Yeah. At one point you were about six inches away from one of the leads.

Steve:

Yes. And so, you know, with that, it was interesting going back and rewatching and making comparison. So I'm sure we'll be talking about the differences as we go through, but it was just interesting to see this version.

Stephen:

Now move on. Ruse is a 2001 jukebox musical romantic drama filmed. It's directed co-produced and co-written by the incomparable Bosler. And it's the final part of his red curtain trilogy, which started with strictly ballroom and continued with Romeo and Juliet.

Steve:

Yes. And it was released on May 18th, 2001 with a budget of $50 million and ultimately achieved a box office of 179.2 million. So quite the

Stephen:

success. Yeah. Now it stars a couple of people we know. Yes.

Steve:

Nicole Kidman is everything to use. So I'll let you rattle off the list of things that you love about her.

Stephen:

Besides this, she also shines in two days. Practical magic. The others cold mountain, the Stepford wives, Australia, big little lies, the undoing nine perfect strangers and so many others. So you like our little bit, ah,

Steve:

she's my favorite actress. Yes. Meanwhile, you and McGregor, we recently discussed when covering big fish. So feel free to go back and check out that episode. If you'd like and many star wars people might know him. Cause we recently celebrated may the first. I'll be with you

Stephen:

and also with you,

Steve:

he's young Obi-Wan Kenobi in the star wars movies. Yes.

Stephen:

And I hear that he's actually getting his own Disney plus series two. Well, good on him.

Steve:

I know. Yes. And the supporting cast includes Jim Broadbent as Harold Zindler,

Stephen:

Richard Roxburgh, as the duke of Monroe.

Steve:

John Leguizamo says honoree to

Stephen:

loose. And Kylie Minogue is the green fairy.

Steve:

Yes. And Broadbent is known for his roles in Bridget Jones diary another year as Tom and the iron lady as Dennis Thatcher, while Roxburgh was van Helsing in 2004, his version of that movie.

Stephen:

Pretty much Bridget Jones diary, and this came out around the same time and it's inter cause he's a father figure in both movies. It's interesting to see him as Bridget's dad and then see teens father figure. It's a different ends of the spectrum. Leguizamo, we covered in to Wong foo for his role as Chichi Rodriguez and in condo with his role as Bruno and Kylie Minogue is of course the gay icon with songs, like can't get you out of my head and higher.

Steve:

Yes. And before it was a movie, it was not a Broadway show yet. No, it was a place, a real place. Yes. A cabaret in Paris, France co founded in 1889 by Charleston. And Joseph Oler who also owns the Paris Olympia. It's known as the birthplace of the modern form of the cane, canned dance

Stephen:

while the original house burned down in 1915, it was rebuilt and is still a modern tourist attraction in

Steve:

Yes. And as we mentioned it later became a musical on Broadway, which we saw it as a new jukebox musical soundtrack with a modern mix of pop and rock.

Stephen:

I really enjoyed how the. Took. Some of the songs that were in the movie and kept them as is. And then some of the other ones, they reworked with some newer songs and it made it feel really fresh again, so that there are there it's two separate entities.

Steve:

Yes, for sure. This musical premiered on July 10th, 2018 at the Emerson colonial theater in Boston, before moving to the Al Hershfield theater on Broadway. When previous started on June 28th, 2019 before its official opening on July 25th and

Stephen:

then COVID happened. Yes, but at the 74th Tony awards, they swept the evening winning 10 of their 14 nominations, including best musical. And after seeing it, I can absolutely see. 100%

Steve:

deserved. Yes. Now the movie starts off a little differently than the Broadway version. It starts with a in 1900 Paris, a depressed writer named Christian begins writing on his typewriter as the song nature boy plays. And we hear his exposition about the Moulin Rouge and the sparkling diamond that he loves to teen and how she died. And then we hear how it all began.

Stephen:

And I love the description where he. The Moulin Rouge, a nightclub, a dance hall, a board Dell though. And it's interesting at the beginning of the movie that they tell you right away that the woman he loves sateen is dead. But somehow first time when I was watching it during the film with all the singing and the dance. You totally forget that it's going to end in tragedy. And you think you're about to have that happy ending because you forget that he's sitting there and it was apartment, all depressed writing a book. Yes. But it is interesting that the movie begins with the flash forward and the whole movie is a remembrance. Yes. It's a memory play as they call.

Steve:

Yep. And then w we remember with him one year earlier, he moved to them and mark district of Paris to become a writer among members of the area's Bohemia movement known as the children of the revolution. Yes. When a narcoleptic Argentinian falls through his apartment roof, Christian is pulled into writing a show by an eccentric. To loose lot, Rick

Stephen:

to loose LA

Steve:

Trek. Yes. And quickly joins the troop as the voice of the children of the revolution. And then they drink absence together. Seeing the green fairy. Yeah.

Stephen:

Originally the green ferry was going to be a long haired muscle. With a giant sitar and Ozzy Osborne was hired to provide the vocals. Eventually it was changed to the current Tinkerbell incarnation played by Kylie Minogue, but Osborne still gives the voice to the fairies guttural scream when it turns evil at the end and flies at the school.

Steve:

Yes. And I remember reading that little bit of trivia and preparation for the movie, and I kept high, like waiting to put it later in, in the movie, because I remember from the musical, the green ferry later on in the second act gets its whole number and it has a bigger piece and it's more part of the story as opposed to just kind of a side thing. And so it was interesting watching this. I'm like, oh wait, I think that's the only time we get to see the green fare

Stephen:

100% yet. Like, and two. As Broadway is known, combining parts. The actress who played the team in the musical is the green fair. On Broadway. Yeah. It's because it's his hallucination.

Steve:

Yes. Now various tricks were used to make John Leguizamo's legs appear shorter because he is not a little person in real life. No. Some shots are of his stand-in, who was of the correct height while and others. He walked on his knees and leg braces were in blue socks so that his lower legs could be digitally removed. Like it was almost to the entire climatic scene. From a squatting position to give him greater mobility for his role. And he had to go to physical therapy afterwards.

Stephen:

I think it worked, I mean, they didn't I don't feel like they were making fun of little people and I. Applaud him for the pain he went through to make it happen.

Steve:

Yeah. I mean, he did a great job in the role. It just makes me wonder whether it was worth it all. Cause I mean, if the, if the part of it was that they really wanted to have a little person by not cast a little person to do the role. And if they didn't want a little person to play it, why did they write it as a little

Stephen:

person? Right. Well, it, because he is a real person, let Trek is a historical figure. Oh, I know. Yeah. And, but it's interesting that in the Broadway musical he's played by a six foot, six foot three black man. Yes.

Steve:

I liked that better

Stephen:

though. Now. Yeah. The Trek in the movie or in the Broadway play. Even better.

Steve:

Yes. Now Christians writing skills and knowledge of pop music, like the Senate of music, allow them to finish their proposed show, spectacular, spectacular that they wish to sell to Harold Zindler owner of the Moulin Rouge.

Stephen:

The group arrives at the Moulin Rouge Zindler and his diamond dog dancers perform for the audience. And they do a. Mockup starting with lady marmalade, then they go into, because it can, can, can, and interweave smells like teen spirit. And it's just really interesting because that's our first taste of the music in the movie. And at that point you're like, oh, this is going to be unlike anything I'd ever seen before. I don't know. And I'm just throwing this out here. I forgot to do the research. I don't know if there were any jukebox musical movies by that point, because this felt very new for me to have. Songs that we should know interwoven as a story.

Steve:

Yeah, no, it definitely was new for me. I was like, wait a minute. I know some of these songs from other places, but you know, as much as the music pulls you in, so do the costumes. That's what drew me in was just how beautiful the costume, where he was. And the wardrobe department created 300 costumes where at one point 80 people were employed for this task. And of course they weren't. Academy award for it. Rightly so. And it's really

Stephen:

interesting too, that anything outside of the Moulin Rouge in Paris is dark and gloomy. Kind of like what we saw with Sweeney Todd last week. And, but anything inside the Moulin Rouge is all color, all action and everything. And I like that juxtaposition as well. Yes. Now. We get to meet sateen as she performs the sparkling diamonds medley. The hand we like continental, but diamonds are a good So simultaneously to lose arranges for Christian to see sateen the star Cortez on in her private quarters to present the work unaware that Zimbler is also promising sateen to the wealthy and unscrupulous duke. Come on, Ralf. I private investor in the cabaret. So it's this whole thing where they're already setting up.

Steve:

In case of mistaken identity.

Stephen:

Exactly. Now, unfortunately during the performance filming was halted for two weeks in November of 1999, after Nicole Kidman fractured two ribs and injured her knee when rehearsing and many of the scenes where she has seen only from the chest up, including. Oh, real actress were sought while she was in a wheelchair. And this kept her from the lead role in the movie, the panic room, which was recast with Jodie

Steve:

foster. Yes. Now Tina agrees to sleep with the duke because of their promises. They'll have a real theater with a real show and a real audience. And she will finally be a real actress. Yes. Now it also helps that scene had already mistaken Christian for the duke and was like, wow. Yeah, I'm really attracted to this guy. So this will be

Stephen:

easy. Yeah. Cause you know that usually the men that pay to sleep with her are not

Steve:

no. And she dances with him before passing out at the climax of this. Yup.

Stephen:

And she pretends to be fine, but comps up blood

Steve:

and let's face it. I mean, we already know she dies at the end. You might've forgotten. I did not.

Stephen:

Now in the Broadway version, her sickness is a much slower burn without the audience knowing kind of what's going on until it happens that she doesn't survive. The story like with this, it's a memory and we know in the Broadway play, there is building. Which do you prefer?

Steve:

I prefer the building to it. There's something I understand about like the exposition he provided up top, but if there was some sort of gray area of like, rather than saying, and then she died saying something like, and then it all ended. I feel like that would have given us. Cause there were so many times like, I mean, When she starts coughing up blood, I'm like, okay. She dies of tuberculosis. And so I really felt like her life wasn't in danger from the duke at any point during the movie, even during some of those climatic scenes where, you know, it was like, oh, well, she's going to just die of tuberculosis because they wouldn't have written it in if she wasn't dying of it. And we know that she dies

Stephen:

and back then they had a much fancier name for it. Consumption. Yes.

Steve:

So I'm shaking junction. What's your function? No, no. Missing it. My history, yes.

Stephen:

Retiring to her private chamber and a giant Juul to elephant with Christian to discuss things privately with a plethora of double entendre moments that lead into your

Steve:

songs. Yes. And that is where she immediately becomes enthralled with his voice, which we hear. and I don't know why I didn't think of it before, but I mean, this makes me wish that I could say, or an age you, cause I am not a natural born singer. And just how cool would it be like to have like a set of pipes like that and be able to romance someone with their songs? I mean, I have to resort to. My brains, my body, my other things, but I just wish I could just sing from the rooftops. And have you be like, oh my heart's a flutter.

Stephen:

I have to go change my pants.

Steve:

Exactly. I mean, it would just be perfect.

Stephen:

I know. Oh, well, I mean, if you had all the talents that you currently do and you could see. You're right.

Steve:

I mean, I would be a quadruple threat or more. Yes, I'll take it out. Your flattery will get you everywhere. Now, during the point where they are having their double entendres and moments and everything like that, you always say how her performance here as Oscar worthy. So tell us all the ways in which you love

Stephen:

it. Yes. So her performance from here through the end of the song, spectacular spectrum. Could have come off as silly with a lesser actress doing it, but Nicole fully commits to it. And by going all in anything that could have been silly is fun, funny and believable. And I always say, and I've used, you know, from American horror story, the main game songs, like when an actor and actress commits to something that could just be a little too over the top. As long as they fully believe it in their performance, we're going to believe it. Like, so he's trying to talk to her and she's on top of him. She goes, whoa, tiger. When she's like rolling around, wrapped up in the blanket and nobody would know he was, yes. Yes. Give me all naughty words. And the whole thing could have just been like too much. But because she's going all in you're. So like right there with her. And another funny thing with the whole double entendres, whenever she gets his pants down and she goes, oh, oh, big boy. And to loose has been looking turns back to his friends and goes, he's got a huge talent. So all of that makes me smile and laugh so much.

Steve:

Yes, it does. And after dancing on top of Paris, Just as she realized that she's in love, he reveals he's not the

Stephen:

duke. Yeah. I love, I can't believe I'm in love with a young handsome

Steve:

duke. I'm not a duke. I'm a writer. Oh

Stephen:

no, you're not one of Oh, so talented charmingly, Bohemian impoverished protege. And then the duke interrupts them and she manages to both entice and evade the duke while singing slash reciting the, your song lyrics to him. And just as she's about to seduce him and Christian is finally sneaking out of the elephant. She sees how upset it's making Christian that she's about to sleep with somebody else. So she tells the duke that it can't sleep together until opening night. And the duke leaves just as she passes out from the stress of all of it. Consumption. And then the duke comes back in to get his hat because she rushed him out the door and finds Christian, helping sateen into bed just as she's coming too. And everybody from the outside, it either looks like he's choking her to death or having rough sex with her while she's just kind of in mid air. And she looks kind of passed out and the Duke's like, is this funny business? And yeah,

Steve:

and I mean the here right from the start, like the duke is a villain, like he's not seen as desirable or in chanting or charming. He just is like, I want to own her. Give me her.

Stephen:

And he, it's a weird mix of dark, dangerous and silly.

Steve:

Yes, I agree. But at the same time in the musical. This is a team. Like, I mean, he's more attractive. He's seen as well, and like sure. He has the possessive nature and ultimately ends up going off the rails as a bad guy. But you know, at first, especially Satina is really torn between the two in terms of not just her duty versus her love, but also thinking that maybe she can love the duke. Maybe she can be with the duke. Maybe she can have him end happiness,

Stephen:

right. Because he's saying, look, you don't have to be a prostitute or any. I will give you all the jewels, all the riches. I will make you whatever you want to be. And then you're just with me. Yeah. And

Steve:

know, no in the musical, I would have gone with the duke, not so much here.

Stephen:

And that's something that the musical really does is it creates a love triangle where here that's not at all. It's more of just a game to keep the duke and he a fine,

Steve:

yeah. Which do you

Stephen:

prefer? So in terms of humor and entertainment value this in terms of believable story, the musical, the Broadway.

Steve:

Yeah. I liked the Broadway version better and Christian Institute cities in a whole emergency rehearsal, but claim they were practicing lines for spectacular, spectacular. Well, you don't have a clip of that baby. You want to sing a bit? Sure.

Stephen:

Spectacular, spectacular, no words in the knack. EULAR can describe this great event. You'll be dome at wonderment returns. I fixed at 10%. You must agree. That's excellent. And then they go into. So exciting the yard against will stomp into so D like tink give will run for 50 years. Yes.

Steve:

And with Ziegler's help to loose. And the rest of the troop pitch, the share of the duke with an improvised plot about an evil Maharaja, attempting to woo. A Hindi cortisone who loves a poor sitar player.

Stephen:

And now you have to ask, is the duke really? This self-absorbed not to realize the plot. There spectacular, spectacular is the same as this movie. And you know that he, like, it's an evil Maharajah, not an evil duke. Like, can we forgive his rich naivete? I would

Steve:

say. And this version with this duke in this moment, you can forgive them. But the moment that they start having to rehearse lines left and right, he shouldn't have needed someone to point it out. Yeah. Like he might like, okay, maybe you're so out of it that you don't realize what's going on when you walk in or when you finish leaving that by the time. She's clearly not that into you. Yeah. I would've think that he, you know, they, he should have picked

Stephen:

it up. Now. This is another scene when they do the spectacular, spectacular, where the actors all go all in and their commitment to the scene and in the editing process where they speed up their movements and things, it makes this whole. Frantic scene. So thoroughly

Steve:

entertaining. Yes. And during the pitch, Christian also takes time to make sure that sateen knows he wasn't trying to trick her, that it was all just a misunderstanding. Okay. And I think that's

Stephen:

important. Yes. Now the duke backs the show on the condition that only he may have access to sateen and sateen contemplates on Christian and her longing to leave the Moulin Rouge to be. Oh, real actress. And she sings the one day. Oh, Hey, sorry about that. And because she desires to get out, get away and leave the life of sex work behind and has that great line. Why live life from dream to dream and dread the day when dreaming ends and like it's and you could see. If the duke was desirable, why she would even consider it because she's lived a really hard life to the age of mid twenties at this point. And I could see her wanting to do anything to get out of it, to not have to pretend every day,

Steve:

all day. Yes. Although it's working for me now, the Bohemians are celebrating their victory and Christians trying to write, but he can't get sateen out of his head. So

Stephen:

he goes back to sateen to convince her to be with him. And she says, oh, I'm paid to make men believe what they want. I can't fall in love with anyone. And that is just too horrible for Christian to understand and tells her all you need is love. And then we get the elephant love, man. The only way of loving me, baby is to pay a lovely fee. Just one, just one guy has no way cause you come and you know, he convinces her by the end, but she so jaded to love in the real world. And, but Christians optimistic and. And he is able to get through it or her line at the end, whenever they're kissing. And she says, you're going to be bad for business. I can tell.

Steve:

Yes. And you were bad for business too.

Stephen:

You weren't not a

Steve:

prostitute. I was not. I did it for free now. Now the duke takes over the cabaret and sateen, and the cabaret is converted into a theater as they prepare for the show. Christian and sateen continued to see each other under the pretense of rehearsing her lines during their time together. We're seeing a different side of sateen where she's lighter, happier, and laughing of the duke becomes jealous and warns Zeller that he may stop financing the show just as ELAR catches, sateen and Christian together. He demands, she break it off with Christian and dine with the duke and the Gothic tower.

Stephen:

And, you know, it seems that they're all kind of losing in the setup. Are they all victims of circumstance or could this be resolved with Christian sateen coming clean about their love or is that even possible?

Steve:

I would say, I mean, whether the duke is a villain or not, I mean, there's, they're straight up just using this poor guy as. And so I feel like Christian doesn't get to actually be with her in the way that he wants. She's torn between the show and her love. And the, the duke is just, like I said, being used as a really awkward wallet. And so they're all losing here and I don't see have a way where she can have it all, but I feel like there is a version in which she could have chosen. Either the duke, right from the get-go and just like Christian go or committed to Christian upfront. But I feel like she's trying to have it all in a way that it's not going to work

Stephen:

out. I think that if they had been honest with the duke about the love, he either would have killed Christian right away or fired Christian and sent him away from Paris. I think that there is no way in which honesty to would have worked out for them. This, I think this is one of those damned if you do damned, if you don't situations.

Steve:

But maybe at this point, once he starts throwing all of his money into the show and it's spent, but maybe during spectacular, spectacular, if the pitch was you just financed us and you don't get sateen, he would only would've said no, but he wouldn't have gone out of the way to kill anyone at that point either. No, it was only once they were using him. Right. I agree with

Stephen:

that. And attach, yeah. Once he would have absolutely said no, I refuse to do the show, but I also think Harold would have told her at that point, my little. Send the boy away. If you want to be a real actress, the duke is the only way. Yes.

Steve:

Either way sateen falls ill from tuberculosis and can't make her dinner plans that night with the duke during the song Gorecki.

Stephen:

Sure. I sure. And it's, it comes upon a really interesting coming up. And so Ziglar has to make an excuse to the duke claiming that sateen has gone to confession because she thinks of tonight as her wedding night and she wants to be clean and pure for the duke and Ziglar performs like a Virgin. And I was laughing so hard and the theater during this, and it still is. Really, really entertaining because it's so far over the top and it's a version of like a Virgin that you've never heard before. And the duke is brilliant. Brilliant, brilliant. In this scene, like we've said, he's unlikable, but as all great villains show, they don't see themselves as the villain and the duke doesn't see himself as the villain. He thinks he's entitled to all this. And you can tell that he has a life of privilege. And has always gotten his way. And that's what makes his character believable is he doesn't see him self doing wrong. He sees that his money entitles him to the things he wants being a sateen,

Steve:

which is unfortunate. But of the time, yes. Now Zindler then goes back and learns that sateen does not have long to live and tells everyone not to. Because why would someone want to know if they're dying?

Stephen:

Well, we see on grace and Frankie, what happens when, you know, yes.

Steve:

Now sateen tells Christian that their relationship in dangerous the show, but he counters by writing a secret love song to affirm their love for each other. That way, no matter how bad things get, they know they will always have each other. I will love you.

Stephen:

Until my

Steve:

Oh, no, you die. Oh no, no. Funny story about this song actually is a tragic story. It is the only original song in the film. Come with me was written by David bearer, walled for Romeo and Juliet in 1996, but not used in the final product. Yep. Because of that, since this song was written for another film, it was disqualified from the Oscars for best. Which you feel it,

Stephen:

it totally would have won that year. It like it would have just cleaned up at with that, because that was besides lady marmalade. This was the song that everybody was talking about. Like that was a big, this is our prom theme this year.

Steve:

Yes. Now as the duke watches, Christian rehearsing with sateen meanie, a jealous performer points at the play as a metaphor for Christian Satina and the duke saying,

Stephen:

why would the Cortis on choose the penniless rider? I mean, see a tall play

Steve:

and then you want to punch her in the face. Yeah. In rage, the duke demands, the ending be changed so that the cortisone ends up with the Mahara. However, a sateen offers to spend the night with him to keep the original line de

Stephen:

yeah. And Christian doesn't want her to do it, but sateen reminds him of their secret song. So the Bohemians wait, anxiously and Nini not having done enough already decides to tell him to Christian, oh, tear up Shakespeare. You'll get shot ending. As soon as the duke gets his end

Steve:

Ang. Yes, the Argentina and then tells the story of El tango day rock. Well at the Duke's quarters, sateen sees Christian on the streets below.

Stephen:

So the beautiful choreography for the movie is thanks to John. O'Connell all known for also known for his choreography and strictly ballroom. And shall we dance now? What's amazing about this scene is you have the narcoleptic Argentinian singing. While the whole cast of Bohemians is dancing with Nini to Roxanne and it's building and it's frantic, it's becoming more violent and more like she's a piece of meat while at the same time, things are going really bad in the fi cathedral. And it's amazing that as the song is building, the dance is building and then the action and the tower. It's just extraordinarily well done. Yeah.

Steve:

I mean the entire time I'm like, oh, the choreography is just a fun romp in the Moulin Rouge. This is the first time where I was like, what there's heart and their soul behind every step of the song. Now sateen realizes she can't go through with it after seeing Christian on the street. And Duke's now okay with that. So he tries to rape her because of course he does.

Stephen:

Yeah. Yeah. And she's thankfully saved by one of the cabaret down. And reunites with Christian who urges her to run away with him.

Steve:

Yes. And as she's packing, the duke tells Hitler that he will have Christian killed. If Satina is not his Zettler really iterates this warning, such sateen, which he refuses to refuse any finally informed her she's dying and

Stephen:

her performance in the scene is so. My whole life you've made me believe I'm only worth what someone would pay for me. We're going away from you from the duke, from the Moulin Rouge, and then Ziglar's performance in the scene where he's usually that cartoony over the top. His voice is all one level, still caring, but there's no inflections. You're dying. Sateen, sin, Christian away only you can save him, make him believe you don't like. You're a great actress, make him believe, hurt him, hurt him to save him. We're creatures of the underworld. You and I, we can't afford to

Steve:

love. Do you agree that she's a creature of the underworld?

Stephen:

Absolutely. She's a creature of the underworld. That's the, like, there's certain things with actors show folk prostitutes. Like they live a different life. Then nine to five people, and this is the only life she knows. I mean, she's only, she's wanting to go from one performance job to another. She wants to go from being a sex worker to an actress. They're both acting and it's the only life she knows. One's just considered more legitimate than the other.

Steve:

Yes. Now, as the show must go on plays, sateen tells Christian they can no longer see each other as she's going to be staying with.

Stephen:

I'm staying with the duke. He offered me everything, everything I ever dreamed of. And Christian refuses to believe since she won't look at me in the eye, tell me the truth. And she goes in for the kill. The truth is I am the Hindi cortisone, and I choose the Maharajah. That's how the story really ends.

Steve:

Yes. Now he tries following her, but it's denied entry to them. Becomes depressed. And at which point this time, I thought that he was going to go on a bender and see the green fairy, but he does not that's in the Broadway show. Yeah. And even though to loose insists that the team loves him. Okay. I know

Stephen:

what's with every fiber of my being Christian.

Steve:

Yes, we are. Now at the night of the show where a Christian sneaks into the Moulin Rouge intending to pace the team to return his love just as the duke paid for her while Hindi side diamonds play. The Argentinian passed this out and Christian takes us costume.

Stephen:

Now the necklace worn by Nicole was made of real diamonds and platinum, and was the most expensive piece of jewelry ever specifically made for a film. The Stefano can tare necklace was made with 1,308 diamonds weighing a total of 134 carrots and was worth an estimated $1 million.

Steve:

Yes. Now seeing how the show came out. Would you go see

Stephen:

spectacular, spectacular in a second? Whenever you're watching, like the whole Hindi sat diamonds performance. And so it's a musical set in India with the great sounds, the dancing, the costumes, and the. I would've been there opening night and probably all that week. I

Steve:

could tell you what. Yes. And you would probably drag me along and I didn't enjoy it enough. Yes. Now Christians catches sateen before she steps on stage and demand. She tells them she doesn't

Stephen:

love him. I've come to pay my bill. You made me believe you love me. Why shouldn't I pay you? So

Steve:

Tina is trying to save him because she sees the duke spotty guard with a gun pointed at Christian, ready to fire. Suddenly they find themselves in this. Zindler convinces the audience that Christian is the disguise sitar player, Christian, to announce this to Tina and walks off stage.

Stephen:

This woman is yours. Now I've paid my whore. I owe you nothing. You mean nothing to me? Thank you for curing me of my ridiculous obsession with. And from

Steve:

the rafters to lose cries out. The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return

Stephen:

spring sateen, to sing the song that Christian wrote to express their love. And especially when she gets too and full of everything and Christian returns to the stage joining her in the song and

Steve:

they have a beautiful finale. The Duke's bodyguard, meanwhile, is attempting to kill Christian, but as sorted by. And the cast of the show while the Duke's own attempt to stop by the Zindler who finally Zed they're finally like steps up and does what he needs to get done. Yep. Or the duke storms out of the cabaret as Christian Institute complete their song, but the come, what may reprise and the coup d'etat finale.

Stephen:

And after the curtain closes sateen com succumbs to the tuberculosis and she, and Christian and affirmed their love before she dies. You've got to go on Christian. You've got so much to give, tell our story, Christian, I'll always be with you.

Steve:

Yes. And a year later, we're back in the apartment, the Moulin Rouge was closed down the duke owning it, and Christian's in the tale of his love for sateen, a love that will live

Stephen:

forever. And then one last time we hear the greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved. In

Steve:

return. If I die of tuberculosis, babe, I want a year later for you to be on your road, to like recovery and happiness and continuing life. Because that's the one thing that got me about this as like shirts sad, but like, you can tell that he spent like that last year in his apartment, not showering and just drinking himself stupid. Yeah. And sure. It was a tragedy what happened to her, but at the same time they had their true love. They had their moment and she wanted him to move on from it and live a full life. And it just seems like he's not doing

Stephen:

well. I think we don't know how much of the time he just sat there. You know, going deep down his dark rabbit hole, but by the end of one year he had the book finished. Yes.

Steve:

And hopefully that leads to greater things, but it doesn't look like it with the way the movie

Stephen:

ends. Now. What are your final thoughts on the movie? Darling?

Steve:

My final thoughts are that this is one where I have to give it to the musical more than the movie. I just enjoyed it. I find, I know how much you love the movie and I can see why you love the movie, but the high moments where its joy and happiness, don't equal out to the amount of sadness that you feel at other parts. And just overall, the movie made me feel a little sad.

Stephen:

For me, this is in my top 10 favorite movies of all time. I've watched. At least 30 times, I would say at least. And listen to the soundtrack hundreds of times. And

Steve:

I, that's why you have depression.

Stephen:

And I love, love, love the Broadway musical, but I almost see them as separate entities. I loved the musical. I prefer the movie. And maybe that would change after Mo more viewings of the musical, which I definitely plan to do as it lives on as a touring company and things. I mean, it's still going strong on Broadway, but you know, when it comes to Tampa, I want to see it, of

Steve:

course. But yes. And I will see it with you.

Stephen:

And like this movie ignited my love for Nicole Kidman. And then right after this, the others came out. Which solidified my love for Nicole Kidman. So I have this to think for me, loving Nicole Kidman. And it wasn't until years later that I realized that this movie that my brother and I had on VHS called BMX bandits that we used to watch all the time was Nicole Kidman's first acting ever as a 13 year old.

Steve:

Wow. I am IMDV

Stephen:

so. It's kind of fun that my, one of my childhood obsession movies also hadn't Nicole. So I guess I've been in Nicole Kidman fan my entire life. And this movie expresses what I think shows her complete range from dramatic to ecstatic.

Steve:

Yes. Well, wonderful. You know what also else is dramatic, but makes me excited.

Stephen:

I know you're trying to go for our list, Harrisburg.

Steve:

Oh, come on. Our listeners are amazing. They make me

Stephen:

so ecstatic and dramatic. That was the part that was

Steve:

the stress I'm dramatic about how ecstatic I am. Yeah. And so I would love to hear what you thought of this episode. You can always engage with us in the socials. We're on Tik TOK, Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook at happy life

Stephen:

pod. And you can also email us. Directly@happylifepodatgmail.com. You thought you had me there?

Steve:

I didn't. And until next time everyone stay happy and don't die of tuberculosis.