A Lifetime of Happiness: Movies, TV, and Video Games

Downton Abbey Series 1 ft. Ronnie Diamond

April 07, 2021 Steve Bennet-Martin, Stephen Martin-Bennet, Ronnie Diamond Season 1 Episode 62
A Lifetime of Happiness: Movies, TV, and Video Games
Downton Abbey Series 1 ft. Ronnie Diamond
Show Notes Transcript

The Steves welcome Ronnie Diamond, Dowager Countess of France, on to discuss his favorite show of all time, Downton Abbey. Before they travel across the pond, they discuss what's making them happy and our recommendations of what to binge in pop culture right now.

Highlights include

  • Yes Day on Netflix- Binge
  • The Irregulars on Netflix- Binge
  • The Last Blockbuster on Netflix- Binge
  • Downton Abbey overview
  • The quest for who will inherit Downton after Lord Grantham
  • The romance between Lady Mary and Matthew Crawley
  • Poor Mister Pamook
  • The brilliance of the Dowager Countess
  • The sisterly drama between Lady Edith and Lady Mary
  • Being gay back then was not so great- surprised?
  • Anna and Bates, along with the rest of the servants

Ending- Any music or audio clips were borrowed from the original source material.

Support the show (http://www.patreon.com/happylifepod)
Steve:

Hello, happy and new listeners. This is Steve Bennett Martin, and this is

Stephen:

Steven Martin Bennett. And welcome to a lifetime

Steve:

of happiness. The podcast where we take you on our journey through some of the movies, television shows, and other bits of pop culture that are helping keep us happy, but hopefully bring a smile to your face along the way.

Stephen:

And today we're going to be talking about season one of Downton Abbey with special guests all the way from France, Ronnie

Steve:

diamond. Yes. But before we get to that old queen, my love what's making you happy. Well,

Stephen:

what's making me happy is that my girl. Jen garner has a new movie out and it's called yesterday and we watched it and I thought it was absolutely adorable.

Steve:

Excellent. Yes. Well that, and certainly, I also think the idea of a, yesterday is something that would be fun to do sometime. Not that we normally say no to each other, right. The day where we push ourselves to say yes to more stuff, we normally wouldn't say yes to or something. Yeah. But we're not going to be. Having any, any children, anytime soon, several give Remy a yesterday,

Stephen:

every day is yesterday

Steve:

for every day is for that. That is true. Sorry, Remy. You're right. All right. What is making you

Stephen:

happy though, darling?

Steve:

Well, I actually am in the works to be a. Doing a podcasting blog where my expertise about podcasting is now going to be used to help share that knowledge with the masses. That's fantastic. And some more details are going to be coming, but I know that Kayden's a previous guest who's been on. I've always mentioned how he's my podcasting buddy. So he's working on a new project that I'm helping with. And part of that, Is a blog. And so I've been able to start writing about podcasting, which is something I love, obviously. And so being able to know that I'm going to get paid to do what I love is also just going to be awesome.

Stephen:

That's fantastic. And I've already read some of the things you wrote and they're really good.

Steve:

Excellent. So we'll be sure to let all of you listeners know how you can find it when it starts coming out. But in the meantime, let's head on over to our binge and purge section. Yes.

Stephen:

And luckily again, We only have binges this week. Yes.

Steve:

And while it wasn't officially part of the list, it might've guessed since it was your what's making you happy that she had a movie that yesterday is also a binge-worthy movie.

Stephen:

Yes. And it's on Netflix and it's fantastic. And for anybody out there that follows logo on social media, check out the interview that Jen did. With peppermint and Ben Dilla cram, and it's really, really cute. They all dressed as their favorite gin characters from past movies. There was one from alias, one from 13, going on 30 and one from yesterday.

Steve:

Excellent. Yes. Well, I know that you love your Jen garner.

Stephen:

I do cause she's a West Virginia girl. And us West Virginia folks stick together. Yes,

Steve:

exactly. Well, in another binge, also on Netflix, which I only realized the irony that it was on Netflix is the last blockbuster.

Stephen:

Yes. The Lac block last blockbuster is a documentary detailing. The. Efforts of the very last blockbuster store in the world to stay open and the people that have worked there and kept

Steve:

it going. Yes. And so it was a fascinating documentary. They, they do tell it like it's edutainment where it's comedians and famous people and faces that, you know, you won't have any AAA actors who are going across the stream, but a lot of people you're like, I've seen them there. I've seen them there, you know And it's, it was really good, but it was interesting, the rise of the VHS and the rise of blockbuster and learning about that is also going to be something that's great for this whole new generation that doesn't understand how it works. But, you know, back in the day of the VHS tape, that was a hundred dollars. I can't that's.

Stephen:

I mean, I remember when DVDs were coming out, they were really expensive to begin with, and that's not. Like, you know, now where they're like, Oh, you get a Blu-ray and on a DVD and you get the digital download code and it has all these extras. And we're going to charge you 26 bucks. Yeah, no, it was like 35 to $40 from the get go at the beginning. It was crazy. But the cheapest place to buy DVDs originally, Amazon. And I think that's one of the ways that they,

Steve:

and it stayed that way. Yeah. But yes, the documentary was fascinating. And it is still open. And if we ever find ourselves in Oregon, in Oregon, we will be driving to bend for sure. Yep. Yes. Now something that we can enjoy from our couch that doesn't require planning a road trip because in the past, yes, it's the irregulars,

Stephen:

the irregulars, which From what I understand is a takeoff on the, a series called the Baker street irregulars dealing with a group of kids who investigate paranormal. And happenings in London during the Sherlock Holmes time that Baker street is famously the home of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. And so they kind of hire these kids to investigate things for them because it all ties back to a mystery from the past. Yeah. And

Steve:

in this so well done. And it's so interesting. You know, one thing that last week we were saying how we love the toll, cause it was this unique idea. Having a show about Sherlock Holmes is not a unique idea. They've done it so many times, and this is just one of the fresher takes that I've seen. And it's just really engaging. It's twisting and turning already. We're about halfway through

Stephen:

halfway through. And what was nice is that Sherlock was. For many episodes just spoken of barely hinted at, and now he's kind of a tertiary character, but it's

Steve:

still not the same. Yes. And I really, I really like it. So I'm excited to see how it all turns out. But yes, so far so Bingy yeah. Yes.

Stephen:

Well, I guess that means that it is time to head on over to our discussion of Downton Abbey. Alrighty.

Steve:

Sounds good. Let's head on over. And now thanks to the podcasting magic. We have teleported across the pond and we are now talking with miss Ronnie diamond.

Ronnie:

Hello everyone.

Stephen:

Ronnie, thank you so much for joining us all the way from France.

Ronnie:

I've got my Baghdad, my cheese old waging

Steve:

and yes. And so before we get into Downton Abbey for our listeners, why don't you explain a little bit about how, you know, Steven and how your friendship started?

Ronnie:

It's been 84 years. You're

Stephen:

not the old lady from the Titanic, however much you want to believe you are

Ronnie:

84. Yeah. And Allison Saturday, this was Steven. I went to school together so many, many, many decades ago.

Stephen:

Now, not that many decades ago,

Ronnie:

400 years.

Stephen:

We met in 1999. Okay. I,

Ronnie:

I still have some of my original bones.

Stephen:

None of your original cheekbones though.

Ronnie:

That's true. But

Stephen:

so the first time I remember Ronnie, it was a Saturday and we were going over for a Mountaineer football game, which is what everybody did on Saturdays. And our friend Dominick studio brought Ronnie along and Ronnie was trying to behave himself. Because he was around a whole new group of people, and he was very excited about the tailgating part, but not the sports ball

Steve:

apart. Well, I can understand

Ronnie:

that I've never been one for sport know staff, just the balls. Well, you have me there.

Stephen:

And from that point on, like, we started seeing more of Ronnie than we did Dominick Sergio geo at that point.

Ronnie:

And if I recall correctly, your mother had a delicious freshly baked lemon squares just for me or so I imagined them to be, and then I, well, or so I commandeered them. Then I began to eat them from then on. I was happy.

Stephen:

Yeah. And so then anytime that I went home for a weekend and I would come back and mom would always send me back with either cherry crunch or lemon squares or something. Ronnie and Monica were real quick to get to my dorm room too. See what mother Martin had sent them a quotation. I

Steve:

was gonna say, well, I mean, I've had mother Martins baked goods before, and I can certainly understand the need to come in to hear them. Cause I happen even now to you when you bring them home. Yeah.

Ronnie:

There is always a need to calm and dear mother Martins, good food. However, I will have it clearly known that those were particularly sign and address to me with the labels

Steve:

that is now on record. Yes.

Stephen:

So you love Downton Abbey. Tell us what about the show like causes such a joy for you?

Ronnie:

So I think, well, going back just a little bit, I've always loved the great Victorian era. The ballet park is they call it in France and it's basically the time between 1871 or after the Franco-Prussian war up to world war one or 1914. And it's at that point in time when Europe was mostly at peace and you see the height of what we now call like the gilded age in the United States or the Victorian era in Europe. And it's during this time, we're beginning to see a huge change across society. The breakdown of what had. Essentially been the culture for centuries, really going back to the conqueror. So it's, at this time we're starting to see a huge change and the role that women play and other forms of diversity coming onto the stage, if you will. And it's through the it's this time, whether it be in literature or film that I cling to most dearly,

Stephen:

I can vouch for that. Downton Abbey, as we've alleged is a British historical drama TV series set in the early 20th century created and co-written by Julian fellows and series one begins at the English country estate called Downton Abbey. In spring of 1912 with the sinking of the Titanic. Now I know you feel strongly about the Titanic as well.

Ronnie:

That's true because if you'll recall, Steven Jay, when we were at school, we'd watch it every week and with popcorn and all kinds of tasty treats, we'd all have Sunday Funday.

Stephen:

I have seen Titanic more times because of Ronnie. And what was it you always used to say, if you could save one thing from the ship.

Ronnie:

Oh, if we could, if I could have just saved one dish, one dish to add to my glory's collection over here,

Stephen:

my dish, it wasn't the people you wanted to save. It was the China.

Ronnie:

People are replaceable is at the bottom of the seat. I had to tell you though you'll find this quite a bit of a surprise, but in 2012, this pot in 2012, I had started a new job and it was the consumer financial protection Bureau. And basically we were creating this agency from scratch, working extremely long and hard hours. And this was after the financial crisis, of course. Right. But it was during that time, I made several close friends and it wasn't until later on into that year, when season three of Downton Abbey came about that my new coworkers and friends were asking me continually. Have I seen it? I must watch it all the time. Oh, what did you think about it this last week? And we were at that time in 2012, we were into season three the first time in season three. And I remember, well, I haven't seen it. I didn't know anything about it. I'd been living under a rock because they'd say people. And I remember one of my friends, Caroline saying, that's not possible. You are Maggie Smith Smith, and you are Maggie Smith. And Carnot is the All-American little young German boy. So here we are. And toaster strudel, toaster

Stephen:

strudel. you are our very own dealt with your Countess and you always have been. Your personality is larger than life. And

Steve:

yet you're not putting on an act for this podcast.

Ronnie:

I have to say I'm flattered, but it must be known that I immediately went home that weekend and I bought season one and two in DVD and you'll know Stephen J very well that I've never been one to collect DVDs and CDs. I could just take them from you if I needed them that badly. Steve, Andrew, sorry. So I went on my bottom and at that point you could have one and two, and I think it was PBS was still playing and replaying. Like they do season three and I caught up and I was, Oh, I can see my past imperfect and my present

Stephen:

and I was late to the game as well, because I can honestly say that Downton Abbey is the first TV show that I streamed on Netflix. Oh wow. And because we were, dad had been diagnosed with skin cancer on his back and the doctor thought they'd gotten all of it, but they want to do cut a little deeper just to make sure. And so we were up at Moffitt cancer center and it was going to be an all day thing. And I tried playing video games. I tried reading, but I couldn't stop my mind enough to focus on those things because I was worried. And so I was like, I'll just find something to watch. And I remembered, Oh yeah, people have been talking about this Downton Abbey. And so I turned it on, on Netflix and I was like, Oh, My goodness, like just the clever writing, the characters, the wit the sass and the opulence, like yes.

Ronnie:

And you know, it really does reflect that time. If, if you're not familiar with Downton Abbey yet, or you haven't seen anything by Julian Fellowes, perhaps you haven't, you don't even remember that you have, or you, you, you don't recall it exactly. But Gosford park, which came out, I think in the late nineties is it was one of his projects and he's written several books that I'll throw out at the end, but I, I adore and I think they're fun to read. So if I think one of his projects right now, that's been on star, so I have to start and stop, stop, stop. Of course the coronavirus, right? No help in this, but as the gilded age, which wall star Key in it now, Christine Baranski. And she will play the, the equivalency of the powerful dowager Countess equivalent in our American gilded age. I

can't

Stephen:

wait to see that

Ronnie:

stop start,

Stephen:

stop, stop. Right. I know. I like so many things that in entertainment have either been delayed or they've just gone ahead and said, you know what, it's going to cost too much money that's canceled. And that's unfortunate.

Ronnie:

Well, you don't have to tell me restaurants and bars and cafes have been closed again since October.

Stephen:

Yeah. You definitely have a much stricter lockdown than we do over here. Yes. Especially

Steve:

since we're here in Florida of all places in the U S

Stephen:

so getting into the show, the main storyline that is the thread throughout the whole season is because of the sinking of the Titanic. Lord Grantham, Robert Crowley has lost his heir and he only has girls. And because of English law, the girls cannot inherit the title. And so can the good old

Steve:

days.

Stephen:

And so they have defined another heir, his daughter, lady Mary. One of my favorites is upset because somebody that they don't know is going to get what would be her money and her title and her house and all of that. And so a lot of it follows Lord Grantham, lady Cora, his wife and lady Mary, and the dowager Countess as they go along, trying to find this air. What did you think about like that back then? Because. Oh, you're more studied in that era than I am, but I just, I always find that shocking that women weren't allowed to own and have,

Steve:

and like the politics of the way that they would arrange like the marriages to make sure, like to try and keep it in the family. what were your impressions of Robert Curley as a patriarch of the

Ronnie:

family? Right. So what this actually has the name and it's called promo janitor. And this was something that was common actually until recently, because it was just changed for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge or Prince William and princess Kate. And should they have had a daughter first, but it was common particularly in the UK at this time that the entire estate meaning the properties, whether that be an estate in the country, a London house typically, and then maybe a few other estates plus the money that helps support it. To support that would all be entailed. Or as we could call it more easily, all wrapped up together entailed. And what would happen is it would then be passed on to the male heir in the case of Robert Kali. And he puts it best itself in the first season when he explains he is just a custodian of the estate of this style living in order to be that good custodian to take care of it and then to pass it on and to keep it going as it has always been, unfortunately Robert and Cora and that's lady core to you, Steve.

Steve:

Sorry about that lady call her up.

Ronnie:

Yeah. So basically I will stick to formality. Yeah, so we We, we get to that part where they want it. Of course he has to prepare his air. He has an air, his, his cousin, his first cousin and his cousin, his son, Patrick. So just so happens that these two are on the crossing of the Titanic. Naturally being men, even though the first class, they are not saved. And then they drown on the crossing of the Titanic. This throws up into question, what will happen to the entailed estate? Who's going, who's it going to go to? I wouldn't be at chimney sweetened, sorry. I mean, we don't know this property. We don't know to whom this property in this

Stephen:

state will go. And it's all lady chorus money because lady core is money in proper Crawley fashion. They bankrupted the estate prior and Robert had to marry for money.

Ronnie:

That's correct, but he was not alone during this time. It was quite common in the 1880s, 1890s. And as we approach 1900 that a lot of the estates based off of their money came in from agricultural meaning mainly. And it was unpaid. It was common at this time for many of them to be running out of money, the things were changing. The industrial revolution had taken place. So they're just, they were getting cheaper goods and from the Americas and whatnot. So they were running out of money. They were still living as they always had. And the money was drying up in order to flush cash into these estates and to keep the families of float young Lords, young or Earls or, and counts if we're on the count and on them, on the continent Dukes, barons, and whatnot. We're going to America, particularly New York and finding young heiresses and their families. Sometimes even very new money who were very interested in seizing a title and in doing so would be flushing this state with cash and probably keep it going for a couple of generations and w and so what happened, and it is in this case that Robert and Cora lady Carla, well, not to me because she and I are equals, okay. You as a servant or an official, you'll say later you car, and then we'll leave it. And so that, but now I tied grants. Yeah. Yeah. So, and that's where we are so that, so we now have two camps develop. Robert wants to be, as he always was the custodian, he wants to keep this state together. He wants it all together and he wants it to move to who his new heir whom his, or to whoever it

Stephen:

may be. Because he sees Downton as larger than himself. It's more than just him and the family. It is an Inn, a living, breathing entity, all of its own.

Ronnie:

Yes. Lady Cora, her daughter, lady, Mary, the first of the three girls and her mother-in-law lady violet won the Intel smashed, broken up. The title would be damned. And then from there Mary named era's of all. So she would not be able to keep the title out of the other than lady. Mary was, she had from birth and would always have, but she could keep the money and all the estates and everything with it. So it's naturally understandable that lady Cora, her mother would be upset about the fact that all of her money has to go to a complete stranger from God knows

Stephen:

where. And it's interesting that whenever they find the air, so it's Roberts. Second cousin, third cousin once removed. So like there's barely any blood at that point. Yeah. And he is a lawyer whose father was a doctor. And what I find really interesting is that they all look down upon lawyers and doctors, where in America, these days you've got, you know, the professions you admire, like, Oh, he's a doctor. And over there they're like, Oh, he's a doctor.

Ronnie:

Well, I think it's really no. I mean, you're, you're absolutely correct. The thing is, is it's important to always remember. We have to be careful when we place judgements on the past in this sense, because we have a normal culture of that time was that members of the aristocracy did not work. Their work was associated with the management and preservation and the traditions associated with the estates. Correct.

Stephen:

And so you've got Matthew Crawley cousin Matthew coming into town with his mother, and he is a lawyer. She was trained in medicine during the African war. And he doesn't want to be an aristocrat. He doesn't want Downton to change him. Then you've got lady Mary who is angry at all of this, and she doesn't want to be attracted to him. She doesn't want to be kind to him. You know, she'll be civil because that's what her manners and breeding have taught her to do.

Steve:

Part of it also like that they were basically saying, well, the easiest solution is for you to marry him. And then it's all fixed. And like the fact that that was kind of arranged, she was like, well, I don't want you to tell me

Stephen:

what to do. And that's the lady Mary always is. If I come to the same conclusion you do. Fine, but it needs to be my choice. You will not push this upon me. Yeah. Seems

Ronnie:

like somebody else. I know.

Stephen:

I do. You know, I have all of the characters lady. Mary's the one that I was like, Oh, I get her. Yeah. That I get, I get the whole thing. Right,

Ronnie:

right. And she, and you know, her biggest complaint from the get-go is, and they're fighting it right there. They all know that the other people are fine. The other person is fighting. So lady violet, lady, Cora, and lady merit are fighting Robert. Cause they want it smashed and he wants it preserved. And they're talking about how they're fighting each other, but they're civil about it. And Mary lady, Mary is most upset about the fact that she feels as though Lord Grantham, her father, Robert will not

Stephen:

fight for her in that. Exactly. That he's the only one that's not defending. What she feels is rightfully hers, but also in general, just fighting for her as his daughter, that he, she doesn't yet understand the love of Downton as a thing where Lord Grantham, as we know, as you said, custodian, she's not there yet in her head. She gets, she gets there in several seasons later.

Ronnie:

Exactly. And there's a, and there's a very convoluted and pass through Narnia that it takes to get there. But one does exist. There is a pathway. Yes. But

Steve:

speaking of identifying with her, I mean, luckily one thing we didn't have to face before our marriage was any of your sex scandals. Cause I just welcomed them. But yeah, the poor Mr.

Stephen:

Mr. which is my favorite line in the show. And it's like, lady chorus says it, the servants say it and they all refer to him as poor. Mr. poor. Mr. Oh, come on. He

Steve:

went out with a bang. They're literally, there are worst ways you can go.

Ronnie:

Probably that was literal.

Stephen:

I, I just found it. That is, I think that storyline is what solidified Downton as something really different for me, because I was. You know, thinking it was going somewhere. And then all of a sudden it's like, Oh, she had sex and killed him. And I was like, Oh my goodness, this really changes the show and turns it into a high society. Soap opera

Ronnie:

for real shenanigans did not occur during that time would be,

Stephen:

I mean, you were there better,

Ronnie:

Ronnie. We w we were the Edwardians. I mean, to think that he didn't engage in all this sorts of lecherous activities would just be a complete fantasy being said, yes, I returned back to 2021.

Stephen:

Yes. No, I found it really interesting that, I mean, of course she's going to turn to Anna, her lady's maid to help. And then they were, then they decided to get her mother involved. And lady Cora is ashamed and shocked, but she's also saying, yeah, we're going to get the body out of here. That's all there is to it. We're going to move this body. Would

Steve:

your mom help you hide your lover's body? If I died when she moved

Stephen:

my body with you? Oh yeah. Mother Martin would get the shovel and. You, you see that, right. Ronnie, you would say if we had to hide a body, mother, Martin would help out.

Ronnie:

I was thinking about the insurance money first and then how we can make sure that everything unfurls in a proper way. Yeah. I definitely say that. I see that for sure. Another mom would definitely be there. I mean, but you see this too, because Robert and I often thought what if Robert had been faced with this? What if they would have brought him into the situation at that moment in time? And of course it couldn't possibly happen because he wouldn't have had the countenance to deal with it. And, but lady Cora being an American and you'll see this throughout the entire series. She, of course she's American there. She has different cultural or was in one thing at this time, it was very important, especially someone of new money, which she was was to at all costs. The perception must be unmatched if you will

Stephen:

pre because perception is reality and that's still a thing today. Like the idea of a scandal or the hint of a scandal. Just as bad as a scandal is just as bad as the scandal was true.

Ronnie:

Although you might not know that seeing all the people in airports these days when they only weigh up pajamas.

Stephen:

Now,

Ronnie:

I think it's trashed with money. It's still trash.

Stephen:

Now, what did you feel like the relationship that was building the season between lady Mary and Matthew? Did you like, did you feel it being sincere? Did you feel the chemistry.

Ronnie:

I totally felt that kind of a streak because we watch it build and we watch it bill as the episodes go on. And then we watch, we w we get into it. Where of course, lady Mary is absolutely 100% against even the thought or the mentioning of you know, partnering with Matthew, but then little by little, we see that lady Cora thinks it's a good idea. And then we find out that it wasn't even lady Cora is a great idea. It was lady Violet's or grandma who was completely against it at first, seeing that the Intel could not be stashed and absent a lawyer who could actually do it effectively, which they

Stephen:

never seem to have a decent lawyer.

Ronnie:

Correct. But then we finally get to the point where through. Bumps and starts and Naji a little gross here and there. If you will, we can see finally a dalliance starting to begin as they, you know, I think we'll go down the

Stephen:

Primrose path. I think they respect the other's intellect and wit, and it starts off with them being sparring partners. Well, you know, wait. Yeah, they both are kind of surprised that, Oh, I enjoy chatting with you. I enjoy arguing with you. And I enjoy spending time with you. I didn't see this coming and they both have that realization without telling the other one, but you can see it both in the way they interact and in their eyes.

Ronnie:

Absolutely. And that's the one thing I have to say, and it's not just in season one and I won't give any sort of details away in case you out there at home. Haven't had the opportunity to engage in it, but that is something that is absolutely one of the things I absolutely love about the entire series is that there will be continual character growth and development, which, and then of course the war will change a lot of that too, but you will re you will truly see character growth in Julian Fellowes work. And I think it's

Stephen:

fantastic. Let's see, we talked about lady Mary. Let's skip over to the other sisters. We have lady Edith and lady civil. Lady EDA is what's very interesting is Laura Carmichael who plays lady Edith. Laura Carmichael is quite lovely in real life. She's beautiful, but they play lady Edith up as kind of unfortunate looking the mountain, the more plain of the sisters. She's definitely the more book smart of the sisters, but she and lady Mary do not see eye to eye on anything.

Ronnie:

And she's the middle child, which has to be said that can be a critical factor. So yes, we see from the very beginning, they're always at odds. They're always like, you know, swiping here, swiping. There are, there's a great line lady. There are great line later on into the season one where lady Mary comes up or lady Edith comes up behind lady Mary and says, Oh, it seems he slipped the hook. Meaning I got, I got away. Yeah. And then lady Mary turns and says, at least I'm not fishing with no bait.

Stephen:

I love that line so

Ronnie:

much as though in that vein, you get a sense of their relationship, which only peaks and valleys as time goes on. Oh.

Stephen:

And you know they tried to push sir, Antony, Stalin strapline onto lady Mary, and he's older and he's boring. He's kind, he's kind and gentle, but lady Mary, that's not the, any of the guy that you would set up for her. And also again, she doesn't want it pushed upon her. It's not our choice, but then you have lady Edith, who I don't know whether it's, well, this is the best that I can do, or I can take this away from Mary and it'll be a victory of mine over her. I think

Steve:

she was just very cock hungry. Cause throughout the site, she just goes after any guy with a pulse that walks her away and like gives her half a half a psych glance. Like she's very like, she's thirsty, she's thirsty

Ronnie:

bitch. And I can't argue

Stephen:

with that because I mean, she obviously goes after cousin Matthew, she's like, I'll show you around to all the churches and then we can do it again. And Matthew is like, how about we bring my mother next time? And which is kind of saying no, thank you. No, thank you. I'd rather not have anything with you and lady Edith fine because Daisy's an idiot lady. Edith finds out about poor Mr. and the scandal and because Edith. Is a horrible person in the season decides to go ahead and out of sibling rivalry and jealousy and anger decides to tell the embassy that exactly what happened, bang, bang, he died during sex, and then the news starts to get out and besmirch lady Mary's reputation. Exactly. Now how, like whenever you saw lady Edith doing that, what were your thoughts at any point? Were you like, Oh girl, good for you? Or were you like, how dare you? This is family.

Ronnie:

I was in raised of her not wanting to protect the family. Right.

Stephen:

I agree. I agree. Like we can fight internally. But I will not set someone from the outside onto the family to hurt some of the family, like our fights, our own, no one else needs to get involved,

Ronnie:

which is exactly what she did and riding the Turkish ambassador who then, and then we find out it gets to other cousins and other family members. And then at one point it gets back to the doubt or count is Dame, Maggie Smith. And then she confronts Cora.

Stephen:

Yup. And like, and chorus, like it did happen. And Maggie Smith ends up being like, you know what? I would, I'm a glare too. Yeah. I'm I, I don't know if I would have had the strength to do it, but I would have tried and I respect you for doing it.

Ronnie:

And just a little bit of foreshadowing here without giving away the total tent in the future. We learn to understand why that may be, that she is so understanding.

Stephen:

Absolutely. Which that was an interesting character development for Maggie Smith as well. Yeah, totally. And so Edith starts to fall for sir Antony and they start to develop a relationship to the point where sir, Anthony is going to propose and lady Mary has, at this point, found out that lady, Edith is the one that the trade, her and Mary, Mary, and proper Mary fashion decides to lash out and get revenge. And she did it in such a brilliant way that it can never be traced back to a thing of Well, what do you mean? I didn't do that on purpose because she goes up to sir Anthony and says, Oh, you're looking for Edith. Well, she's probably avoiding things because there was a horrible bore that was going to propose to her today. And I hear that he's just the worst. She does such a good impersonation of him. She should be on the stage. And sir, Anthony's like, Oh, damn, that's me. And so he tells me that he's leaving and Edith is crushed and looks over to Mary across the garden party. And Mary raises a champagne flute tips to her and it's kind of like, Hey, Edith, screw around and find out you just found out. And I love that in and of itself that Mary was able to get revenge because in her mind that was Edith's only man ever. And now I've destroyed the relationship. Right.

Ronnie:

And it's even, and you know, that that's true. And at that point, what options did eat at top, even there was a private conversation going on with Cora and Mary earlier in the C in the season. And, and chorus says to Mary that she ought to be kind to her sister, eat it because Edith has less advantages than Mary. And so it is known. And I have to say, you know, it's kind of like she is so in real life, she's beautiful. She is beautiful.

Stephen:

Carmichael is

Ronnie:

gorgeous. Do you know Sarah, Jessica Parker is beautiful and then they can also make her look the same way. I think both of those women are in similar in that they are truly beautiful, correct. Just with, you know, the slight of the angle and this and that you can, they can have them appear just however they'd like.

Stephen:

Exactly. And one of the things I loved when it was in the season finale as well, and they had just come back from season. And, and in London and court lady, Cora turns to lady civil and is like, you should be proud of how you handled yourself during your first season in London and her debut. And Edith is like, you never say that to me. Oh, don't I eat if you were quite helpful,

Ronnie:

it's not as though she's trying to be unkind. It's just I'm and that's something that we're probably not as used to today is blatant honesty and just telling people how it is. And I'm sorry that you have to be mollycoddled or I'm sorry that we have to wrap it around a STEM of cotton candy in order to present this difficult information to you. I mean, it's the same, it's in the same vein as not letting children watch Bambi or things like that, you know, they're just. It's different now than it was a hundred years ago. And to be quite Frank during that time they were just more Frank and more specific in their

Stephen:

feedback. Now we've got lady Sibel who is the baby of the family. What are your thoughts on her as a

Ronnie:

character? Well, who doesn't love lady simple, sweet kind, compassionate, loving, very progressive. And although her in season two, we see her character progress even more than we could possibly ever imagine. Right. We do get began to see glimpses of it at the end of season one. And that is when she starts to see, and we start to see her show up in new clothes and new frocks that she had. The dress maker makes it's a new style and it's looking it's because again, this is right before World war one. Right? So the styles did not change drastically until we get into the flappers of the twenties. Right.

Stephen:

And so which show does a really good job of showing later on.

Ronnie:

Exactly. And for her to be that Avalon guard at that time does say something special.

Stephen:

Now it also felt like a lot of her storylines we're. Okay. Not as over time, I guess. Whenever you look back lady symbols, Kay. Trudy, like lady symbols caring about the vote. Isn't going to be one of the major storylines that audiences remember over time. Like sometimes I feel like lady Sibyl can be the forgotten sister with the forgotten storylines.

Ronnie:

Well, yes. And yes. And I do agree with that, but also because you bring up specifically the vote, remember this was all at the time and, and great, you know, England had the vote for women before the United States did. Of course they did that. And they had to be older than 18 at the time, but I think, you know, they did have it before. And so when we see this with the vote in her interest, in the vote and she starts to participate and things like that, and we see her blossom in that direction and become, I, I hate the word ignorant, but it's true in this sense that she does lose ignorance related to those topics. And she becomes well-informed and without giving too much away, we could later on down the line The dowager Countess makes reference back to this. And I think to save, this is towards the end middles of season two, the dowager accountants even makes references to this as in lady Gregory County, just mock you of itch. Why the Irish rebels so well bull

Stephen:

and yes, but I mean,

Steve:

I, I also feel like, I mean, for all the characters in the number of stories that they had to go through the season, they had such a huge cast to have so many different stories going on in the six episodes and have them all be so well told.

Ronnie:

I mean, we haven't even gotten to downstairs and that's

Stephen:

where we are

Steve:

now. And you love heading downstairs. So let's get on

Ronnie:

down there. Let me grab my passport.

Stephen:

So, and lady civil is a good introduction to downstairs because she is helping go in to leave service and become a secretary, which it really humanized. Lady, Sibel so much where, you know, they're all very civil and friendly to the servants, but simple was like, I'm going to help you. We're going to be friends. And she sends poor Gwen off to live in the North in game of Thrones after this. Well, right.

Ronnie:

So, and remember, and, you know, Julian, Julian Fellowes is very accurate here. It does. Does this reality, is this a possible reality for this time? Absolutely. But 20, 30, 40 years before that maids servants, footmen, not footmen, but maids would turn the other way and face the wall when one of the family were walking by. So things did change and things were changing at that time.

Stephen:

And that's really interesting in of itself.

Ronnie:

Yeah. And anything with Gwen, because she's so kind, she's so sweet. She's so she has so much potential that just if given a chance, we can also watch her blossom. And, and so yes, maybe Sybil takes that interest and she helps her just take such as job interviews and things like this. But she's what we really see too, is another side where with Gwen, the question is well, why do you want to leave service? Why would you want to leave service? Why do you want to leave it? Because I can say the question comes up, what we would ask ourselves. Well, why aren't her parents supporting this change? Right. Well, you know, in her. Her father. She says, thanks. She's got it great where she is. And her mother doesn't want her to get quote unquote above herself. And this is the mentality really honestly, into a few decades ago. And even still in many cases, what we call the old crab bucket when somebody starts to do well, the rest of the people want to pull them back down. And in this case, it's just ingrained in grains century. After century, regardless of culture around the world, don't be better than your others. Don't be better than this. Don't try to improve yourself.

Stephen:

And I mean, you see that with groups of friends and family and things. You know, somebody gets a promotion at work. Are you really happy for them or do you wish they were back down on your level? You know, somebody gets a new car. Well, why did they get a new car? Like you don't you want, cause it's the way

Ronnie:

God wants it. That's why

Stephen:

you want to have nice things for your friends and family, but you don't really want them to be nicer than what you have.

Ronnie:

Well, and the reason, and there in lies the rub, right. We hang out often and we are with those that are similar to us. And then what does that actually result in? Or what would we call that by any other name, which then just so goes hand in hand with this series?

Stephen:

Yeah. Okay. And one of the speaking of

Steve:

class lists, we have the

Stephen:

villains. Yes. We have our two villains O'Brien and Thomas O'Brien is lady Cora's lady's maid. And Thomas is the first footman and Thomas is also gay, gay, gay, gay

Steve:

back then, I'm guessing it wasn't really accepted or talked about much

Ronnie:

at time. You could still go to prison for hard manual labor, as we saw with Oscar Wilde. And he was of the upper echelons as well. I mean, what was considered, what are the upper classes for not to set an example? It was not setting an example.

Stephen:

And it seems like it wasn't too much of a secret because Mrs. Patmore knew and because Daisy, who's an idiot, Daisy's just an idiot. And she falls for Thomas and Thomas flirts with her just to get back at William who he hates. And Mrs. Patmore is like, he's not the boy for you. He's not a ladies, man. Yeah. Yeah. He, he's an unfortunate soul. And you know, or unfortunate. So, and Daisy's like, yeah, you're right. He's too good for me. No girl. That's

Ronnie:

not what I'm saying. Well, that is true.

Stephen:

Most everyone was too good for Daisy, just because she's that I was

Steve:

gonna say at that point, it would've been like, nevermind. You're the perfect beard.

Ronnie:

Shay is a scullery maid for those listening and, and a complete simpleton.

Stephen:

Yes. And that's all that there is to it. Mrs. Patmore was one of my favorites downstairs because of her sass and her one-liners and her humor, but also her heart. I really, really liked Mrs. Patmore. And I was personally worried for her with the whole eyesight storyline.

Ronnie:

Now, see, this is something where I would think most of the audience would also be very concerned. They're going to get rid of her. They'll throw her to the wolves. It's the end. It's the end for her. We're going to ride her out. Right. Well, you'd be surprised, although they didn't have a lot of of course technology and surgeries. Weren't that advanced in fact, they really didn't become more advanced until after the first world war one and then into world war two, but she's basically getting cataracts removed and it was not uncommon really for that. We'll take care of your own mentality in place. So I was not surprised that Lord Grantham and Corey, you know, want to pay and pay for the cataract surgery and to you know, take care of her as much as they can. But I could also see on the other side where people watching this for the first time giving the, the. The pre you know, the, the thoughts of snobbery and this and that, that they would just throw her to the gutter.

Stephen:

W who was your favorite of the downstairs characters?

Ronnie:

Ah, Oh, well, let me think about that. Honestly, I really just love Carson.

Stephen:

I love Carson too, and I love how he is so personally protective of the family and he

Ronnie:

feels them as his family.

Stephen:

And, and I think most of them also see Carson as part of his, their family. Like, yes, lady Mary, especially sees him as a second father.

Ronnie:

Absolutely. He was there when she was born. You will see this as you know, the, the series develops and the plot thickens that their relationship is as strong as it possibly can be. And he has been there her entire life. They're very close. They're very much alike, just like she's very much like her grandmother. So the three of them are usually in the same camp and the same school of thought when it comes to anything. And as it was often said, then, and it's mentioned in the series, but said then in reality as well, the servants are often more conservative than the families. So take that into consideration as well. And

Stephen:

do you go back to O'Brien and Thomas, they immediately hate Bates.

Ronnie:

Immediately. Yeah, I'll check. No, you, I have to change my answer. Mine. Favorite person downstairs is Anna. I had

Steve:

forgotten that. I was like she's,

Ronnie:

you know, when I agree completely, when we, when we first started, there was the first picture that came into my mind and I don't often think of downstairs, but Anna is that one special character, just nothing but love and positive energy, moon beams exudes from her body. So she's fantastic. That's my favorite. Yeah,

Stephen:

she's absolutely kind. And then

Steve:

Carson, and then anyway, she and Bates had their relationship develop and she comes to his rescue and stands up for him so much, which is really cute the way that their love develops.

Stephen:

Okay. And

Ronnie:

it's

Stephen:

All right, Thomas is stealing all around the house. He's stealing money, he's stealing wine and. He gets caught multiple times and keeps trying to blame it on Bates because he doesn't feel Bates deserves the position of Vallat because he wants it.

Ronnie:

Exactly. And the reason why he wanted it was because when the first episode of season one is opening, we see Bates on a train on his way to downtown. And we, at that point, of course, we don't know that's at the same time, we're finding out the Titanic has just sunk and so on and so forth. But when we get there, when Bates arrives at Downton Abbey, he immediately is judged by all the others because he has an issue with his leg. And it's a, it's a war injury. He has an injury that was left over from the board's war in South Africa. And that is an injury for which he's judged by all the downstairs staff.

Stephen:

And she found betters.

Ronnie:

Well, of course, and, and until they find out downstairs in any way that he got that injury while he was in battle with Lord Grantham, so they are comrades in arms. And then, then, then we see a little bit of the falling of the

Stephen:

eyes. And that honestly makes Bates kind of our point of entry character point of view character with the show, because in a lot of things, you have somebody moving into the apartment building or starting at the company in TV shows so that you have somebody that. You have everyone

Steve:

else gets to explain, this is how it works. Right.

Ronnie:

So, right. So with Thomas and this case, because he's coming to serve as his Lordship's valid, there was a, there was a former valid who had left, who had retired. And Thomas had been the substitute during this time. And it's for this reason that he's embittered, he wanted to stay on as valid. And now, now why is he being passed over for a long John silver as he puts it? Yeah. Yes. And then of

Steve:

course, like a good queer here, recruits his old Haggin to help him with his scheming. Yeah. And

Ronnie:

she is a piece of work back in the back of the knife box, Ms. Shaw,

Stephen:

O'Bryan, it doesn't have a lot of redeeming qualities throughout most of season one. You don't really have a reason to root for her as a character. You may enjoy her performance, but she's not somebody you. Associate with, or you are endeared to, because she's only nasty to people. She is Hottie and antagonistic to people. I was like, and then

Steve:

at the end, I mean, talking about geriatric pregnancies from before we hit record, I mean, she ended up being the one who hurt lady

Stephen:

Cora. Yeah. I mean, and, and that, that was an interesting scene where there was an interesting scene where that was interesting scene, where she had felt that she was about to be fired by lady Cora because she misunderstood that Cora was helping lady violet find a new lady's maid. And so she thought that Cora was looking for a replacement for her. And so she was feeling hurt and left out. And she had been feeling the sting throughout the season. And so lady Cora drops the soap it breaks into, and originally she said, careful, the soap fell, but it went under the tub and then O'Bryan moves it. And she's like, I'll show her. But right at the last second, O'Brien's like this isn't who you are. You, you're not the person to hurt somebody else. And just too little too late. Yeah. And she goes back to say, look out my lady, but it is too late. And lady Cora slips falls and something we haven't talked about is lady Cora had gotten pregnant and with a boy with a potential heir and this soap thing causes her to lose the baby. And it would have been a male heir that would've solved all their pains.

Ronnie:

And as I say to my husband, Brent, on a daily basis, You can't unring about now. So we don't even truly see her an issue. And that was really that's really for the individual audience member to decide for him or herself. Does she make up for that in season two? And that's a question to watch for,

Stephen:

and you're absolutely right. And you can see it. Have you back for series two. Yes. We'll have to do a series too. That can, she is a better question then. Does she try? Because you can honestly see, even during the garden party, she's trying really hard to take care of Cora, even in her heart, when she still thinks she's about to be fired until lady violet comes and says, you know, Cora has been helping me try to find a new lady's maid. And then O'Brien realizes that all the anger and everything she felt. Was misguided and undeserved. And that Cora was her defender and was never going to get rid of her. And I think that that right there culminate a combination of the, Oh God, what have I done? And my actions weren't necessary to begin with is something that changes O'Brien on a deep level. I think, I think it's the beginning. It's the beginning of the change for O'Brien.

Ronnie:

Well, precisely. And we, we see this constantly throughout, even with Robert or Lord grant them, that is, he's not a fan of O'Brien. He would be quite pleased if his wife, lady Cora were to get rid dismissed this lady's maid and find another one. You won't hear any

Stephen:

complaint from

Ronnie:

me. So, but it is lady Cora, who is her staunchest advocate and her biggest cheerleader. Yep. I mean,

Stephen:

Cora was like, if we are to be friends and she does, I think the way she talks to O'Brien and relates to O'Brien. I do think Liddy Cora does consider them friends the same way Mary considers Anna, her friend,

Ronnie:

but there still were lines that weren't crossed and decorum etiquette. And though just the, the social way of the workings of it all were how they were. And you have to play within that role. And. She overstepped the Mark in that first part of season one, when she's discussing how she disapproves of Matthew Crawley to wit, to which lady Cora overhears, and becomes upset, which then leads and all the rest.

Stephen:

So now let's move on to the thing I've saved for last, you appearing on screen the dowager Countess. Tell me why you love the dowager Countess.

Ronnie:

I think first and foremost, I think the reason why I, but I think the reason why most people like her and this character is she can say what she wants. She can say it in a time when, and in a place of course, where you had to certainly filter everything that you said. She says what she wants. She gets her point across. She says it with wit. I like that she gets away with it. Yeah. Well, and you know, that's in part due to her age as well. You can get away with more as nice way. Yes.

Stephen:

And her, her status and her age definitely play into her favor with getting to say whatever she wants and people, you know, treating her with respect and her being revered and feared because she has a sharp tongue.

Ronnie:

Exactly. Precisely. And you know, it's not as though she just comes out and starts yelling at someone it's not as though she just comes across and says you know, it starts cursing left, and right. Of course that's what peasants of today always do. But at that time, that's not what one would do. It's certainly not of her class. And the one example of this is at the beginning of season two and I won't give too much away, but they're getting into World war one. And she goes, she leaves the dower house to go over to Downton Abbey and she's there. And she's says, Robert, dear, you wouldn't mind if I arrange the flowers, do you, Corvus flowers always look more appropriate for a first communion in Southern Italy. So we have, we have the zingers left and right, but it's done at I would say it's done in a special manner only, and specifically tailored to her.

Stephen:

That's like when lady Cora and the dowager are talking about how they can help Mary and working on the Intel and lady Cora says, Oh, we to be friends then. And the dowager says we are to be allies, which I believe is a great deal. Better. Exactly. And what are some of your favorite of the dowagers lines in season one?

Ronnie:

When upon her meeting Mrs. Crawley and Matthew, for the first time they meet in the grand hall of Downton Abbey and Mrs. Crawley Matthew's mother walks forward and says, what shall we call each other? And the dowager Candace says, well, we could always start with Mrs. Crawley and lady ground.

Stephen:

And one that one that I always associate with you is when Matthew says he's going to be working during, you know, working a job. And Lori Grantham's like, I want to show you the, how things run the state and how things run around here. And Matthew's like, well, I always have the weekends. And what does the dowager say? I, for some reason, I always associate that with you.

Ronnie:

And you are correct in doing so. My idea, there are so many in that scene in season one and so many good ones. I have actually, some of my favorite ones are in three season three and season five, which we will get to hopefully at one point, but that wouldn't has so many tall at dinner. I think it's the second or third time. And they're talking about the hospital and how Mrs. Crawley might be interested in, you know, volunteering or helping out with the faucet hospital, given that her husband, late husband and late father with my doctors and she trained as a nurse during the war. And Matthew says, well, who pays for that? And the dowager Countess puts down her fork and knife and said, Oh good. Let's talk about money, which is never done English among the English upper class. Yeah.

Stephen:

And Mrs. Crowley, I didn't run out of it

Ronnie:

cause it didn't talk about

Stephen:

Mrs. Crowley and the dowager have a rivalry all season. And absolutely, and for a good bit throughout the show where they have this rivalry that lends itself towards a friendship. But you know, and unfortunately, because I was always teamed dowager Mrs. Crowley seems to get one up on our from time to time and finally Mrs. The dowager gets one back at Mrs. Crowley and she goes, well, put that in your pipe and

Ronnie:

smoke it. Your quarrel was with my daughter, lady Rawls. So protesting or pipe and smoke, which was a saying at that time, that again, another another way that I just love and fellows is it's for the most part, everything is exact, nothing is said, unless it was already said, or had been said when using those sorts of phrases or idiomatic expressions that we, and when we still say that today but you know, that that is another great example of character development and growth with these two women as they evolve throughout the series. And it's a fantastic thing to behold. Yeah.

Steve:

Cause I was gonna say, cause while at first it almost started off mildly antagonistic. It turns into them kind of both plussing pushing each other to, to grow and be better.

Ronnie:

Exactly. Clearly they do that. And it's nice to see. It's really nice to see. Well, and

Steve:

I'm like YouTube who egg each other on to be worse than worse.

Stephen:

Yes. It's nice to see.

Ronnie:

Vulgarity is no substitute for wings, Steve.

Stephen:

I totally forgot where I was going at that point

Ronnie:

then I'm flattered.

Stephen:

So, darling, what are your final thoughts on Downton Abbey season one, because this is your first time to sit down and watch it. All the way through with no interruptions for season one on purpose. Yes.

Steve:

Yes.

Ronnie:

This is probably the hundredth or two. Oh, are you talking to him? I

Stephen:

was talking to him

Ronnie:

this startling. Well, this dog called me daughter.

Steve:

That's a different that's that's more of a dialing.

Stephen:

So Steven, my love, yes, this is your first time sitting down, watching it all the way through because though I was a fan. You came in later. Yes.

Steve:

And again, I'm not typically into period pieces. I do find that even rewatching the first season, it was.

Ronnie:

He

Steve:

says it's a pity. It is a pity. It's, it's a, it's a sign of my low intelligence from what I hear, but I, I don't I don't, I liked watching season one to see where it all kind of starts, but I definitely feel like the, as they develop the characters better in the future seasons, like it gets more interesting and engaging. So you know, hang tight if you liked this a little bit, hang tight, cause it gets better and better. In my opinion,

Ronnie:

I, I'm glad to hear you say that because you know, the number one and series right now, it seems, or that I've read a few weeks ago that it was, was brick curtain and it is a fantastic series and it's really the same sort of series. This is all. Well, I think it's a little bit closer to Jane Austin, if you will. This is a little bit more, I think, closer to the whole Henry James Edith Wharton sort of group, which are my favorite and, but. If you like bridge return, you will like down to now, I would offer that. It's great to give down a chance because finally, and eventually, and still keeping with the times you will see more diversity, diversity, you will see more inclusion, which I think is one of the reasons why Bridgeton was so popular and is so popular and will be

Stephen:

required. Well, and the thing I loved about Bridgehampton is that they really did colorblind casting, where you could be black, white, or any race, and they did. And it wasn't a topic of conversation because they just treated it as if everyone was the same, which we know back then that, you know, no one of color would have been. The queen

Ronnie:

or, well, we, you know, and this is what this is actually kind of interesting. I often wonder, and I know we won't have the time this time, and it's certainly a very deeper conversation, but should be had none. The less is how many decisions in the past would have had to really been made in order for it to been kind of like bridge or tend not to go off on a tangent because I will offer that. It is thought to be that queen Charlotte was part black. Right. And it is also clearly known that Pushkin who was a noble in czarist Russia. His grandfather was 100% black. So there is not as though there wasn't diversity in there at that time. I have often wondered myself what mine, what decisions along the way during, during this blip of history, when you think of how old the earth is, what had to been made for it to be more like Bridgeton and actually, probably not that many you're right.

Stephen:

You're right. And if you could like sum up. Your final thoughts on season one and looking into season two, go for it.

Ronnie:

We'll make sell. It rises up.

Steve:

Yes. And so w with that said, if you haven't watched it in a while, want to rewatch it now, or if this has inspired you to check it out, you can not only watch it on Amazon prime with your prime subscription, but it is available on peacock, which I believe is now paramount. Well,

Stephen:

No peacock is peacock is different. Peacock is the NBC streaming service. There's so

Steve:

many streaming services. Now I get them confused, but it's on peacock for free. Or if you have Amazon prime, which most people do, it's free there as

Ronnie:

well. Peacock. Isn't that? What they used to call you? What university old caulk

Stephen:

I do declare

Ronnie:

and I decline

Stephen:

Ronnie. Thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you. You would have been

Ronnie:

flattered to be

Stephen:

remembered well from time to time, we do remember you. We try and forget, but we can't. I know it's like that STD that won't go away.

Ronnie:

Okay. What, tell us more about that. Do you think it'd be something No, not really. I must go. I must

Stephen:

go well, and I hope that you will join us again for a future episode. Whether it's about Downton Abbey, season two or any other movie that brings you joy that you want to share with the world? Yes.

Ronnie:

I'd be happy to, I adore providing guide

Steve:

and until then, Ronnie, stay happy.