A Lifetime of Happiness

Final Destination ft. Travis Ray

September 08, 2021 Steve Bennet-Martin, Stephen Martin-Bennet, Travis Ray Season 1 Episode 84
A Lifetime of Happiness
Final Destination ft. Travis Ray
Chapters
A Lifetime of Happiness
Final Destination ft. Travis Ray
Sep 08, 2021 Season 1 Episode 84
Steve Bennet-Martin, Stephen Martin-Bennet, Travis Ray

The Steves welcome back Travis Ray from the Dapper Bowtique to discuss the horror classic, Final Destination. 

Topics discussed include:

  • Candyman (2021)- in theatres (Binge! Go see it now!)
  • Clickbait (Netflix) - Travis highly recommends
  • Final Destination movie details and background
  • The actors- then and now
  • Franchise highlights
  • Do we believe in Death with a capital D?
  • Favorite death scenes
  • Our school trips

Check out Travis' work at The Dapper Bowtique today: https://www.dapperbowtique.com/

Ending- Any music or audio clips were borrowed from the original source material.

Support the show (http://www.patreon.com/happylifepod)

Show Notes Transcript

The Steves welcome back Travis Ray from the Dapper Bowtique to discuss the horror classic, Final Destination. 

Topics discussed include:

  • Candyman (2021)- in theatres (Binge! Go see it now!)
  • Clickbait (Netflix) - Travis highly recommends
  • Final Destination movie details and background
  • The actors- then and now
  • Franchise highlights
  • Do we believe in Death with a capital D?
  • Favorite death scenes
  • Our school trips

Check out Travis' work at The Dapper Bowtique today: https://www.dapperbowtique.com/

Ending- Any music or audio clips were borrowed from the original source material.

Support the show (http://www.patreon.com/happylifepod)

Steve:

Hello returning happies and new listeners. This is Steve Bennet-Martin, and this is

Stephen:

Stephen Martin-Bennet. And welcome to a lifetime of happiness.

Steve:

The podcast where we take you on our journey through some of the movies, TV shows, and other bits of cop culture that are helping keep us happy while hopefully bring a smile to your face along. And

Stephen:

today we're talking about

Steve:

death. That's a little grim, babe. I'm down for it, but in what context?

Stephen:

Well, in death, there are no accidents, no coincidences, no mishaps and no escape. Oh,

I

Steve:

know this one. That means recovering final destination. The first in one of my favorite horror movie franchises. That's right. We are. Yes. And we're also welcoming back special guests, Travis Ray of the dapper. Botique welcome back. Hi

Stephen:

guys. We are so happy to have you back. And because listeners that have been with us for a while will remember we had Travis on when we did our episode a lifetime of bow ties and we got introduced to Travis through some amazing ladies with the support Sarasota Manatee black owned business group and Travis Meghan. The most amazing handmade bow ties. These are very special and we feel very lucky to own several of them. And Travis is just a light and a joy here in Sarasota. And to get to know, so this is very special for us to have you back on them.

Travis:

Thank you guys so much for having me and also the compliments on the boat size. I, it seems like every day I'm being challenged to create something different, which I think is so fun, you know, especially here in Sarasota. Yes.

Steve:

And since we last spoke, what's been making you happy in either movies or TV.

Travis:

Ooh. I have been binge watching Netflix and I just recently got into Lucifer as well as this this new series clickbait. I don't know if you guys are familiar with either of those, but those two have really made me happy clickbait just because the nature of of the unknown and. Social media to create Kilz and Lucifer, just because I love seeing the lead character, of course we know him from the past or what we know biblically, but him being able to struggle with living life in Los Angeles and dealing with reality and also dealing with those those human beings that we all take for granted. Someone who was a celestial being has to honestly learn to cope with. So I'm loving both of those things right now. Netflix,

Stephen:

I've heard amazing things about Lucifer and I've seen a lot of memes. With him in a Speedo that like people are saying, you know, I watch Lucifer for the plot. And then under it says the plot is him in a Speedo. Yeah. Right.

Steve:

But it sounds good to me.

Stephen:

So right now, something that I've been talking about for the past couple of weeks, and I'm still loving it and you may have seen. I'm obsessed with queen sugar right now.

Steve:

Yes. So you're still thinking that

Stephen:

I'm only on season three right now. I'm catching up on Hulu, but it's so damn good.

Steve:

Do you know, it also is really damn good. What is it Candyman

Stephen:

to not stop? That was three and that's enough.

Steve:

Yes. We saw the news. I don't even know what the, whether you call it a remake, cause it takes place in the same world as the first one.

Stephen:

I think it's a direct sequel. Yes,

Steve:

but the, the new Candyman movie was just amazing.

Stephen:

Nia de Costa. Amazing things with that movie, adding it, honoring the first one, adding a deep and meaningful mythology for that demographic in Chicago and around the world. But then I also loved how it really related just to mirrors with so many things. And. For a good bit of it. You didn't see him outside of the mirror and just the way that was shot, it was beautifully done. And I'm very excited to see what she's going to be doing in the captain. Marvel SQL the marvels coming up. I mean, she's a very talented director, so I'm severely impressed.

Steve:

Yes, it was definitely like, not only just a good horror movie, but it gave you just a lot to think about. I mean, the whole idea of. You have to like, literally like, look at your own actions in the mirror to be able to summon him. Just there's a lot of crunch there

Stephen:

and just the violence and hatred over hundreds of years creating, manifesting this. Oh yeah.

Steve:

So we'll see. Speaking of manifestations of evil, let's get into the

movie.

Stephen:

Yes, absolutely. And so. Why do we love this movie? Travis? Why don't you tell us why you love final destiny?

Travis:

I love the I love Alex literally has this, this whole premonition that sets everything up and I love how he's able to, and some of the others to kind of a little bit here or there, the other characters, they also get a. Of what he sees because they all have the ability to see these things. And I, I love the fact that this was literally a premonition that came to life, but at the same time, we're having to kind of work backwards to figure it out maybe faster than Alex does. And so I really love a movie like this entire franchise where we're literally saying the premonition, but we have to go back and kind of help. Take it apart to hopefully see if we can, you know, like figure out who's going to be next. And also if they can skip someone. So I love that whole premonition slash plot of figuring it out. And then you kind of know, but then hopefully someone else can get skipped and saved. So I love that whole, that whole play with with the movie.

Stephen:

I love that this has something similar to some of the saw franchise where the success on these movies. Is us caring about whether the characters do end up dying because you have to end up having likable characters. And I think they do a really good job with that of even with. Smith's character of Carter that, you know, you're rooting for Alex and you're rooting for clear. And after a while, you're like, you know, I don't even want anything bad to happen to Carter. I want these kids to figure it out. And that says something about the writing and the directing, and they're acting with that because it could be throw away if you just didn't care about the character. Yeah.

Steve:

I mean, I certainly love it for its freaky gruesome deaths and seeing how they're getting set up. And you're like, is it coming? Is it this one? Cause they have like the FOSS leads and you're like, is it going to be the vodka bottle that cracks with the coffee mug? Or is it going to be, you know, the, the water trail, like in the bathroom where like, you know, in each senior kind of just like knowing something's about to combat your, not knowing what it's going to look like and trying to see the clues yourself as it happens. But I also can imagine, like, I mean, I think that we all at a more subconscious level, I'll just also love the idea. Like that is definitely something that's inevitable. And we face in our real lives and the concept of being able to see the signs to, to cheat. It is something that draws us all in because you know, if you could see the science to stop your own death, like what, well,

Stephen:

I mean, you know, whenever there are diagnoses like cancer and things like. People get very serious about their more own mortality. And you know, that doesn't happen to that as many people on a daily basis. But with this, you have these people that death is now presented right in front of you. And you have to confront that your actions can very quickly. Lead to your end.

Steve:

Yes, exactly. And for those of you who are not familiar with this movie, you should go and watch it right now and come back because we're about to spoil the hell out of it. But I am DB summarizes it as Alex Browning is among a group of high school students writing themselves for a trip to Europe. When he suddenly has a premonition, their airplane would crash. He screams to warn the others, but instead he's thrown off the plane.

Stephen:

That is a well, okay. This is another one of those where I'm going to give IMDV a pass because. If they go too into it on the description, it will ruin it for anybody ahead of time. So, you know what I get because this movie is so spoiler-y, I give IMDV a pass on this one. Why don't you tell me how you would have discussed? See,

Steve:

cause I feel like, I mean the whole concept of the movie, isn't the plane crash, but the fact that they avoided death is like literally like the whole basis of the movie. So I would summarize it. As Alex Brown, he has a premonition when boarding a plane of its demise and uses the chance to save him in a group of others only to find that death does not plan on letting them escape their time.

Stephen:

I think that's very good. And the, like the concept of death as an entity, I really enjoy. And there are a couple of times. They kind of give it form where you see it in a reflection like a dark cloud passing over. The thing. So it's really interesting. The movie itself was released on March 17th, 2000. Oh my goodness. It can't really be that old.

Steve:

So you,

oh

Stephen:

my goodness. Yes. 23 million and a box office office of 112.9 million, which as we said, spawned, the

Steve:

franchise, it has now had five moves. Well, this is the first, then it has two, three, the final destination, which ends up being alive because then they also have final destination five. And this is one of those movies where every year too, I make sure to Google to see if there's another one in the works, because I want it to come back more.

Stephen:

Yeah. Like this is one that I would be okay with them rebooting at some point. Yeah. And Yeah, because I think that enough time has passed and yeah,

Steve:

especially now that you know, it's been 21 years. Yes. And one thing that the movie was directed by James Wong, from X-Files fame, who also was involved in writing the process with Glenn Morgan, from X-Files and Jeffrey Reddick and his films. What I thought was interesting. And I didn't know this when I was until researching the movie for this podcast, but he wrote the spec script to be an episode of the X-Files, but new line cinema who created the movie, encouraged him to write it into a film, which then Wong and Morgan picked up. And this was once first theatrical, directorial debut. So even though they'd been doing X-Files forever, they were like, this could have been an episode bubble, make it a movie and they directed

Stephen:

it and you know what? I can totally see it being. An episode of the X-Files that like, that totally makes sense. So the stars of the movie, there's Devon Sala as Alex, which people may know him from idle hands. Ali Larter as clear rivers who is amazing and legally blonde obsessed and the resident evil movies.

Steve:

Yes. It also has Carol Smith as Carter, many know him from Dawson's Creek. I also know him from the short-lived, but very good CW show

Stephen:

unexpected. I loved that show and it has a greater. Cannon fodder.

Steve:

We mean supporting roles, babe. Yeah. Whatever. Yes. And so this movie starts clearly inspired by TWA flight 800. Okay.

Stephen:

So stop right there. Okay. You say it clearly inspired by TWA flight, 800. Like we should know it. And you and I were talking about this last night and I had no idea what you were

Steve:

talking, which is amazing, but I guess it makes sense because I mean, Travis, or did you hear about this flight in real life that happened.

Travis:

Yeah. Vaguely. Cause I remember I know it like had like some type of appeal or something. Cause I remember a lot of people were talking about it, but I just, at the time I didn't really connect it to the film. Yeah.

Steve:

I guess it's because I grew up on long island that TWA flight 800, it was a Boeing 7 47, 100 that exploded and crashed into the Atlantic ocean near east Moriches, New York on July 7th. 1996 at about 8:31 PM, 12 minutes off of its takeoff out of JFK international airport. And so all 230 people on the board died in the crash. There wasn't someone with a premonition, but this is so based off of it that they actually used footage of them, recovering pieces of the plane and stuff from this flight from this real life travel. Spawned the movie. So yes, it is a real life thing that did happen. And you know, the similarities are very, you know, if you, if you don't know about it, you wouldn't know. But I remember just being in New York at people railed after it.

Stephen:

Okay. And tell us about the movie itself.

Steve:

Sure. Alex and his class are getting ready for a school trip to Paris. And before takeoff, Alex has a premonition of the plane exploding in midair, killing everyone, and he panics getting himself and a handful of others thrown off the plane, which leads us with the survivors. They include Alex himself, his best friend, Todd with one D, which has also death, interim in. Jock Carter Carter, his girlfriend, Terry, a teacher, Valerie and students, Billy and clear rivers, whose name I always thought was Claire until this go around. Really? Yes.

Stephen:

I was like, oh, she had hippie parents. Like as soon as I heard her name, I was like, her parents were hippies. That's all there

Steve:

is to. Yes. And so with this, starting off with the big crashing you have, first, like you mentioned earlier, we have to care about these people. How does the set up the characters for you and what are your first impressions of them

Stephen:

immediately? There's a lot of people. I don't like,

Steve:

like who I

Stephen:

wonder it was, you know, you have the two girls that are on the plane link. Can you trade seats with us? That are you're the girls that a lot of people knew in high school that. Subtly or not. So subtly flirt with people to get what they want, having no intention of it being more than them getting what they want. Well, don't worry. They died. They did. There's also like Carter doesn't do much to ingrain himself to you right off the bat. Clear you is. I mean, they go out of their way to show that she's intelligent and a loner, because while they're at the airport, she already has her nose in a

Steve:

book. Yes. Did you have any favorites right off the bat?

Travis:

Ooh. So I liked, I liked the relationship between Alex and Todd especially because those two guys were so close that they would actually be using the bathroom at the same time. Yes. That's so funny.

Stephen:

That bothered me. So,

Steve:

yeah, I don't think I've ever had a friend I pooped with, but that does bring you to a new level of closeness with it with your fellow man.

Stephen:

So one of the things I found interesting. Now, what was the original name of the movie going to be going to be

Steve:

flight 800 or no? The, the re the flight in the movie, not the flight from real life flight. 180 flight

Stephen:

180. Yes. Yes. And it ended up be called final destination whenever there Alex is checking his baggage in and they put the baggage ticket on. The camera zooms in onto his baggage ticket and in big letters that says final destination, and then underneath it, it says Paris. And I was like, oh, I got it. And it was last night that I got it after

Steve:

21 years. Yes. Well, you know what, I think that's the last time, the first time that you got it, as well as that you and Alex share something very important together.

Stephen:

Yes. Because. The departure time of a flight is 9:25 PM. And the woman at the counter was like, oh, and that's the same as your birthday. And nine twenty five is also my birthday. And it was funny

Steve:

because I looked, I looked over at you to see your reaction and there was no reaction at all. And I was like, babe, she just that's your birthday too. Right? You're like, oh yeah, that is, we have the same birthday.

Stephen:

I was so busy taking notes on different things. The thing that struck me is that they were walking by and they weren't Harry Krishna's in the movie, but it was similar and the guy handed him something and he's like, death is not the end. And so I was taking that note, write about that was happening.

Steve:

Yes. And as you mentioned, the film was originally titled flight 180. The reason why they changed it was they didn't want it to get confused with other recent films of that time. From 1997, they had an air force one and contract. So they wanted to get away from anything flight themed and the names.

Stephen:

So one of my favorite B movies is snakes on a plane. I love it. I think it is over the top. It leans into its campiness. It doesn't try to hide what it is. They tried to change the name of it to whatever flight it was in the movie. Yeah. And Sam Jackson was like, no, No, no, no, no. He goes it's about her fucking snakes on a plane. Just keep the damn name.

Steve:

Yes. Well, I'm glad I did cause that's his own call classic movie at this point.

Stephen:

So they're on a school trip to Paris,

Steve:

like. And I didn't bullshit on that. I mean, what kind of school tests?

Stephen:

Paris. I went to Spain.

Steve:

You went to

Stephen:

Spain. I went to Spain for two weeks. What kind of rich

Steve:

ass white school did you go to?

Stephen:

I grew up in rural West Virginia. We had to raise money for a year, each of us to go

Steve:

to an over-privileged Catholic school and he took us to six flags for the day. And that was our biggest. Gung ho yeah,

Travis:

that was ours to the six flags. We would have been able to go to Greece, but you know, that didn't happen.

Stephen:

We had to, each of us had to raise like $1,500 to go. Wow. But we had a full, yeah. It was awesome. That two weeks in Spain is a huge highlight of my life.

Steve:

Imagine, but yeah, it was definitely jelly over the idea of doing it. These extravagant trips, when all we got was, and all I got was a trip to six flags. Well, the rides were awesome. I had fun. I'm not going to knock it, but it certainly wasn't.

Stephen:

I'm always jealous in movies where these kids have problems that are seem unrealistic because my problem was in the cafeteria going to Paris, we went to Spain, Spain, whatever.

Steve:

Yes. Now the crux of this movie is, you know, it sets up the franchise with the theme of having that massive death scene premonition and in the beginning, and I feel like this one was actually the shortest one that they had with the whole accent only occurring over two minutes. But you know, the idea of this was just definitely terrifying enough to spawn the franchise, but. I personally can't think of any other beginning that affected me more in my real life than the start of the second movie.

Stephen:

100% wrong logging trucks are still terrifying to this day. I'll

Steve:

drive a lane over or two lanes over just to get away from the logging truck. After watching the beginning of the second one

Stephen:

so far up to get around to them. And it's not just logging trucks. If I see a truck that has a bunch of metal poles in the back of it. Right. Anything that can come off and okay. So short story. Growing up, we had this lady that would come clean the house once a week and her sister was out checking the mail and a logging truck went around a curve. And so in where I was from in West Virginia, it's top of a mountain, there are no straight roads. Everything is curves. Logging truck came around. The curve logs came off. Correct. Oh God. Oh. And it turns out it was because the truck had stayed overnight. And the next morning, the logging guy hadn't re tightened the things on the logs and they had loosened enough. That they were able to break and oh, but, so I always think of that too. Whenever I think of that opening. But Travis, do you agree the log truck seen as the worst?

Travis:

Definitely. And I think one of the technical aspects, yeah. Also the, I always think about is the I think it was a bottle, like a plastic bottle that fell underneath one of the ladies that was driving one of the cars and she couldn't put on brake and run. And I think that was like the technical. I want us, I don't know if she was the first cars, something that kind of sparring that whole. Pile up. But I remember too that whole sense of not being able to break because of bottle or something that's underneath the pedal that the brake pad that also like, kind of irks me too. So I'm always watching out for that.

Stephen:

Anything that I drop on my side when I'm driving. Don't get stuck under the pedal. Don't get so good. And I didn't realized that it was from that movie that I have that. Thank you. Final destination causing all kinds of driving fears.

Steve:

Yes. It helps us all drive safer.

Stephen:

Now this is all about premonitions or deja VU. Have you guys ever had any, you know, strong sense of deja VU or something where you're like, you know, I need to not do this right now.

Steve:

I'm going to let Travis answer cause I don't, I typically, if I have a thought, I act right away and don't put much thought. And so deja VU like seems like it requires some level of like thinking before you act, which I just don't. What about you? What about you, Travis?

Travis:

Oh, honestly, it feels like almost every single day, there's like some type of an instance where it's like, Hm, should I go this way? Or should I go that way? Or should I do this or not? I, a lot of times, almost every day, I feel like there's like this choice that I have to make. And I guess I'm making the right choice because I'm still here. But yeah, I do have those, those instances a lot. It almost feels like an everyday thing. I know it's not that much, but definitely, definitely.

Stephen:

Yeah. I like, I haven't had a deja VU that kept me from dying, but I have had deja VU things where I felt very strongly and have changed my actions like, oh, you know what, I'm not going to do that. Or. And I think that in those instances, whether it's, you know, our ancestors or the universe that are just saying child stop. Yeah. I think we should listen.

Steve:

Yeah. Now going into the movie. Yeah. Would you like to take over for a little bit of the summit summary? Sure.

Stephen:

39 days after you're the accident, they hold a Memorial service for the victims and that night an unusual chain reaction results in Todd accidentally hanging himself in the shower. So it was really interesting how it happened. He's using the bathroom and all of a sudden water is leaking from under the toilet. And it spreads across the floor and they added some blue color to the water so that we can make sure that we saw it and he's over there and he's shaving. And he goes over to finally get in the shower. And there are so many instances you think are going to happen. Like, is he going to cut his throat while he's shaving or when he was plucking his nose hairs, is he going to jam it up into his head? I was gonna say,

Steve:

is that what the, the S the music on the radio that was gonna

Stephen:

drinking himself, and then he goes over and it's one of those pull cord drives. Cords and your shower. We don't have one, but I've seen them at hotels. And, and

Steve:

I always like avoid it, like the plague. Now, this death of him, like slipping and tripping into it and having it wrapped around his neck. And just slowly stuff came to death. As you see his eyes become bloodshot, like justice, like S like that, that's the one where like, I look away and there's not a lot in this movie that like caused me to look away, but that one I'm just. Yeah, I can almost like feel him not being able to breathe, watching that scene. Yeah. Yeah. Alex

Stephen:

doesn't believe that it's suicide. Just because he knows Todd and also whenever he had been looking at the penthouse and he threw the magazine at the window to scare off an owl and the magazine got chopped up in his fan, the war, the letters T O D landed on his leg. And so that's why he ran out. Clear also felt something strongly about it because she said that night of the accident that she didn't see what he saw, but she felt what he was feeling. Yeah. And that same night that Todd was dying, she had the same feeling again. And so they decide to break into the funeral home and they run into the undertaker, William bloodwork. Who is so brilliantly classed with Tony Todd.

Steve:

Yes. And he, he reveals the survivors have escaped deaths plan and the deaths now coming for them. And when they try and warn the rest of the survivors outside of cafe, Terry's killed by a bus Regina George style.

Stephen:

That was such a big thing because you. Like in the others, there was a buildup like with Todd, like it stretched over like five minutes in this one, you know, she's like, if you're just going to get angry and try to beat him up every time you seem, well, you can just go to, and like, you can just drop down or you can just drop dead. And then she steps off and bam and blood splatters all over them. And everyone was there because it was Carter and Terry and clear, and Alex and the teacher had just. And the idiot was there too, Billy.

Steve:

Yeah. And so with wish William Bloodworth then were Titian. Do you believe him, Travis? That death has a plan for us? All,

Travis:

definitely like that whole monologue.

Stephen:

Oh, absolutely.

Travis:

With him saying it. Yeah, definitely.

Stephen:

You know, he's working with death every day. He sees how the, all these many people die over the years. And I think whenever he or anyone would be around death, that much, you probably start getting. In tune with those type of forces. So, I mean, do

Steve:

you feel like he's, he's more in touch than your average mortician or is this just a skill that people get if they work with dead bodies enough?

Stephen:

I think if he's, I think if they're open enough, I think some people can just go through it as a job, a job. And, but I think he takes it more seriously than that. With more respect for. The passing, not respect for the bodies as we saw him pull the thing out of the guy's neck and, and giggle when it's Yes,

Travis:

I think he sees Def in itself as he respects it and sees it as the entity that it is. But I think he also sees the act of dying or death in itself as an art form. And I think that was one of the things that really made me listen to him. Even more cause like you guys were saying I felt like, because he worked in that in the area, the field, he knew that that was the only thing that was constant, you know, that we had to live and we have to die. But I think that death and the way in which it has like that, you know, that plan to him, I felt like he saw that as an art form. And so, but when I would hear that monologue and you know how it is. In those movies, it's always that one person that comes and catches you off guard and gives you insight into something that we all kind of figure out, but that person just comes in and kind of like underlines it or like puts a stamp on it. And he did that. And so I just, and, but his voice in general to me is just very, you know, that, but that's how I saw

Stephen:

that little thing. Somebody having the voice and gravitas of Tony, Todd. Yeah. It makes you sit up and pay attention. Yes, it certainly does.

Steve:

And Terry's death also made these survivors pay attention and actually signals to Alex figures out when he sees on the news, the way that the plane crashed, like what caused it, that death is reclaiming the survivors in the order, they should have died. He learns that a little too late for miss Luton, whose house explodes after she's in paled by a falling kitchen knife.

Stephen:

Oh, so that was another one. It was brilliant setup because they set this up where you could see the pieces going into place. She put the kitchen towel over the knife block and you're like, that's something. Yeah. And,

Steve:

and then the mug of filled with vodka cracks in the vodkas spilling everywhere,

Stephen:

but also whenever she had shined the teacup. We solve death though behind it. And she even saw it at that point. And so she had originally gone to make tea. She saw something through the hot water out, changed your mind, as you said, put the vodka in cup cracks. And so she drips. All through her house and onto the computer monitor, which sparks causes a fire. She leans down to look at the computer monitor, which explodes and the Glasgow's and cuts her throat. And she's beginning to bleed out and the computer sparked and now the vodka drips are catching fire and going back to the kitchen and it starting this whole thing, the stove and stuff go off. She falls to the ground and the moment that you knew it was building up to. Yeah, because of the knives earlier and she's reaching for the. To stop the bleeding in her neck and she pulls it out. The giant Michael Myers kitchen knife goes right into her chest.

Steve:

Yes, it certainly does. So Alex is too late. He's an idiot who takes the knife out. So the FBI get involved and they're really going after him now. Meanwhile, the teens regroup and Carter is next, but he freaks out and stops the car on the train crossing so he can die in his own. Right.

Stephen:

Oh, which the whole thing where he had all four of them in the car and he was like, I'm going to go on my own terms. And he's driving like 90 miles an hour through long island and like, oh, it's, it's one of those things like. You're not very likable, but you have two and a half people that are likable in the car. Cause Billy has done this to throw away

Steve:

that one. I mean, if you have, if you're trying, if you're trying to like think of sand to it, you can also see that he's probably the most terrified out of all of them. And that's why he's acting like a petulant little child, but the rest of the group does flee the car. Carter changes his mind at the last moment, but death has other plans. However, he's saved by. Which results in the train, flame shrapnel from the wreckage to capitating bell.

Stephen:

Oh, which, and it wasn't like at the neck, it was at the mouth. Yes, it was so great. When the head came off and the body stands up for another couple seconds before falling over into a ditch. Yeah. So going back to Mrs. Loosen. What were your guys' thoughts on that whole scene as it was happening? Like, did you, like, was there any way that it could have been prevented?

Travis:

I think the setup, the setup, like you were saying, that's something it felt as though, you know, she was setting up her own death. Like, I mean, like, you know, like everything that you went through that you mentioned how she like went through it. And I was trying to think what could have, cause mind you, you know, like with the shrapnel in the neck, she had a chance because it wasn't a it was enough to bleed her, but I don't know. Cause remember she covered her, her hand, I think with her right hand, she covered. Kind of the shrapnel. So I don't know how deep that is. I think that if she had if it was just the shrapnel, she probably could have survived. But when we, you know, when all the other stuff happened with the knife, cause remember the knife fell into her. But again, I think when Alex got up there, I think something happened in a chair, hit the knife again, and her. And I think that if she had avoided the knife, I think if the, the, the major Michael Myers knife hadn't fallen down into her, but she honestly pulled it because she was trying to get the towel to try to, I guess, stop herself from bleeding to put pressure on that, or pull the strap and Robert something when she did that, I felt like that was the end of it

Steve:

because so often. You know, with, with Todd, there were fake outs and a lot of these scenes there's fake outs, or it just happens so quick. But like, this was like this long puzzle and you're seeing the pieces all come together at the end. And there weren't like fake accounts. It just all led to her, this freak out the accident, quote, unquote,

Stephen:

this is the one where I was like, okay, death is not messing around now. And he is going and the FBI agents, I know that they need like storyline wise. Shoe makes no sense to me. They have to have somebody in there trying to delay Alex from doing what he was doing and you have to have, because we're, we saw his vision and we're willing to go down the road with him and believe that he can see it. There have to be people that refuse to believe like there has to be that character that is saying. Kid you're wrong and possibly thinking, okay, what did you do to cause all these things? Yeah. Like the typical adult, like yeah. Teenagers would be like, it's just an adult trying to like, say that they don't believe us and it fits. But damn they're annoying. Yes.

Steve:

They certainly are to the point where, when I first wrote the outline for this, I was like, I'm just going to skip over them because they're annoying. But I guess I'm glad that you put it back in, but yes, Alex realizes that by saving Carter is skipped him and went on to Billy. So now thinking that

Stephen:

he's in it, yeah, that was like the also Billy's death that was so fast. Like, but it was Travis. Have you seen the movie deep blue scene with the sharks and the under underwater lab?

Travis:

Yeah. Yes. Yes. LL cool. J right.

Stephen:

Was that the one that was Sam Jackson and Billy's whole speech there right before he got decapitated is such a Sam Jackson in deep blue sea speech where he was. And the first thing we're going to do is we're going to close off these things. So the sharks can't roll and, and Billy's doing that whole thing of I'm going to stay away from you because then death could just find you and boom.

Steve:

Yes, it definitely was shocking. Leaving the group to feel like Alex thinks he's next. So he hides out in a four to five cabin, but then he remembers that he in clear it changed seats, meaning she's. As he's running and chasing and defying death on his own to get to save her she gets trapped inside of her car, surrounded by loose electric cables, but Alex saves her by grabbing the cable so she can jump out of the car before they ignited gas alone, gasoline link, leaving them feeling like they're all safe.

Stephen:

That was very tense with the dog and the power cable and the storm and the pool

Steve:

and the dog I throw in a dog and you have my attention to make sure that the dog is okay, fuck all these people, but you know, right. The dogs

Stephen:

and that like, and I don't know what it is about. Movies with power lines, enlightening. Like the, that's another one where I'm always like, okay, what is gonna happen to me? If a power line falls on my car, like thanks to movies like this. That is something that goes through my head. Yeah.

Steve:

What did you think of the, the climax of the movie?

Travis:

I not knowing when I first watched it years ago and then also watching it recently cause I wanted to make sure I was on my, my P's and Q's for this opportunity, you know that theme. Originally it was written for Alex to die there.

Oh,

Stephen:

I didn't know that

Travis:

it was originally written for Alex to die. And then they had other rewrites that happen to there at that moment where Alex and Claire had gotten together. And then eventually she has a baby. That would be. But Alex would have died. He would have taken the the you know, she actually would have taken the wildlife deer off of the car and then he gets shot into the, like, into the garage a little bit further. And then the police try to come and try to you know, revive him, but they can't, and the nest kind of slow to where it would end and all of that, but I thought. In that moment, it was tough because clear, literally could move, because remember there was a thing, cause she basically, they got in the car and then there was like this metal piece that went through and then remember the Juul was door, was jammed and all of this. And then it was on top of her and all of this. And then Alex came around and I just thought that, oh my God. Something's going to happen to someone because you're dealing with all of these, these crazy elements. But I remembered if you're in a car, remember. You're on rubber. So in regards to the electrical piece, you're good. But when the metal piece went through the window, I then thought, oh my gosh, she needs to like, kind of squinch to the corner. If not, she's going to get a shock. You know, especially if Alex like were to have would have been fighting with the wire enough where it would. Connected. And so yeah, that thing to me was really crazy. Cause I knew we were at that moment where it was like somebody has to die. And thank goodness they didn't in that moment. But yeah, I just was like, oh no. And that was like two of my favorites. So,

Stephen:

so we have a time jump again and it's six months later and Alex has dyed his hair, very blond and they are in Paris finally. And they are at a cafe. Now the movie originally wants us to feel calm. Like everything is better. I never like at that with this movie, I wasn't calm until the credits were rolling. And, and then Alex starts getting premonitions. He sees a bus again and the wine spills and it goes over the thing and reminds him of the. Path of the explosion and he thinks that nobody saved him. So death is still coming for him. And that's when there's the whole thing of another bus and crashing into this and running into a bill. And Carter saves him as the sign swings down and Carter's like, see, I saved you. I saved you. We beat death. And then the sweat sign comes back and swings right in the car. And everyone

Steve:

says, no real loss. Let's go home. Right? Yes. But it also,

Travis:

oh, go ahead. I was going to say. Did you guys see also the one that signs swings, the number that's on the sign.

Steve:

Is it the 180?

Stephen:

Yes. Oh, okay. That's I bet you like, if we go back and watch, there are probably one eighties throughout, throughout the whole, the John Denver song that was playing. Every time somebody was dying like on the radio, Mrs. Luton's house.

Steve:

And he died in a plane crash.

Stephen:

And John Denver died in a plane crash, but not before writing the theme song for my state country roads. Oh, okay.

Steve:

Wow. So one thing, well, one thing that I always find fascinating in horror movies is this whole it's not over. Of like, you know, the kill, the bad guy or they cheat death and everyone's about to live happily ever after. But then at that last minute, it's like, but is it,

Stephen:

well, this is the point where the killer comes back for one final scare. Yeah,

Steve:

exactly. Why do you think, I mean, obviously they keep on happening because we respond well to them. Why do you feel like in horror movies? We don't like everything wrapped up in a little bow, like we do in romcoms. Why do we like the idea. There was more, I,

Stephen:

I actually don't always agree with that. Like the end of scream one after they're dead and it, you do feel calm and happy as Gail's doing her and a call rang out over nine one, one, like something from a scary. Like, I like that it felt wrapped up. Like everything was going to be nice and okay. The ones where, but I do also like the ones where you're left to like, oh my gosh, evil one, or, oh my gosh, what happens next? I think there's a place for those. Yeah.

Steve:

What do you think Travis?

Travis:

I like a mix of both. I think that it's the, the ones that are more open ended, I find that it, it gives us more room and it actually keeps us on our P's and Q's so that we can be waiting. Like you guys mentioned earlier that you're waiting, you know, you're checking to see if there's going to be another final destination, a movie, a part of the franchise coming back. But what that does is that also. Pulls you into it and makes you in some crazy way, you're a part of the of the film. You're a part of it. And I think that's the beauty of leaving it. Open-ended I also think that certain movies lend themselves to. A nice button up conclusion. But what also stirs back up their fan base is when they do add that sequel and it, again, it kind of does the thing. Thanks. People get kind of like, oh, they should've finished it. They, it was all good, but some movies, like I felt, I felt this first final destination when it was happening, I just felt like it would've been, yeah. Too easy to try to wrap it, but what we, what we had seen with those quick deaths, as well as those well-planned out deaths, I just felt like it was going to lend itself to more it being more open-ended and I'm glad. The second one was one of my favorites,

Steve:

sending it off into a franchise. And the second one is more closely related to the first one than any of the ones afterwards, like, oh universe. But you know, other than that amazing car scene in the beginning of the second one, any other highlights throughout the franchise that you will always love or think

Stephen:

of? So the ones that bother me are the girls in the tanning beds. Yes. That. Well affects me. And the one where Stephie from BOMA beautiful is getting her eyes lasered. Oh yes. And it just burned through her head. So those two have, and then the one right after that with the glass Pain's flattening the kid. Oh

Travis:

yeah. Oh my God. Yeah, that was, that was, I want to say, was that outside the dentist office?

Stephen:

It was outside. It was outside the eye doctor's office.

Travis:

I doctor, yeah. Yeah. Those those ones, any of the ones where you're dealing with real. Everyday situations that we all tend to do like going to a tanning Bayer or to the eye doctor or to the dentist. And oh, the one where the, the, the, the mother, she was getting her hair done. I don't know if you guys remember that one. Yeah. And then the rock or something came through and then it, like Lily put a hole through her eye. You know, that one was crazy. Cause you know, we all go and have to get like our hair done and a haircut or something or a manicure, you know, it feels kind of a one, those, all those basic everyday. The situation type ones. Those were the ones that got me more than like, even though the rollercoaster was kind of crazy too.

Steve:

The rollercoaster is crazy. I also love in the, I think it was the, was it the second one with the, with the mom, with our hair getting caught and her head in the elevator. Oh,

Stephen:

I think that was the second one where they were all trying to stay in the loft

Steve:

together. I think of that all the time. And then I also just loved in terms of an LOL where the guy's butthole got sucked out by the pool. Oh, yeah. But yeah, this franchise is definitely something special to me. I love all of them in their own way. Travis,

Stephen:

we have you're on the line. Why don't you tell some of our listeners about the dapper boutique and boutique and about what you do.

Travis:

Yes. So the dapper boutique is my web-based company that I started a couple of years back where I specifically create handcrafted bow ties and fabric accessories for the dapper and the chic individual. We have to add the ladies in now. So everything that I create, I create by hand right here and beautiful Sarasota, Florida. I do you know, as I mentioned, the bow ties, but I've gotten into. Adding more. So bow ties, pocket squares. I actually started doing fabric, head wraps and bandanas, and I've done some for the pooches too recently. And so I want to get into more of that. And one of the things that I'm also trying to do more of in the future is I want to start outfits and clothing, as well as offering arm styling consultations. So, you know, as the brand is, is, is growing, I want to do more for our community. And I have a lot of buyers of course, out of, out of state. But with the company in general, I recently landed a bid at our innovation hotel. So the entire wait staff there will be wearing my bow ties covenant soon.

Stephen:

Congratulations. That is fantastic. And we will put the website. For your business in the show

Steve:

notes. So if you want your own custom-made bow tie or any of the other fabulous things that he mentioned to just scroll up in the show notes and click on over and get in contact

Stephen:

with him and on the original post for the week, we will also tag the business right then and there. So if you're looking at this on Facebook you can just click the link and it's right there and it's super easy. So thank you guys. Very welcome. Thank you. And you have an open invitation to come. Anytime there is a movie or TV show that you would love to chat about.

Steve:

Yes. And thank you guys. We'll keep you in mind. If we do final destination to if listeners, if you want to hear more of the final destination series or you have another, another suggestion for a future episode, how would they find us? My love? Well, they can find

Stephen:

us on all the socials, whether that is Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram at happy. Pod.

Steve:

Yes, you can also reach out to us directly with your little bits [email protected]

Stephen:

Fantastic. And until next time everybody stay happy

Steve:

and look out for the signs.